Weather Alert  

*TROPICAL STORM ISAIAS MOVING NORTHWARD ALONG THE EAST COAST* This product covers Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut ***TROPICAL STORM ISAIAS MOVING NORTHWARD ALONG THE EAST COAST*** NEW INFORMATION --------------- * CHANGES TO WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - A Tropical Storm Watch has been issued for Orange and Putnam - The Tropical Storm Watch has been upgraded to a Tropical Storm Warning for Bronx, Eastern Bergen, Eastern Essex, Eastern Passaic, Eastern Union, Hudson, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Northeastern Suffolk, Northern Nassau, Northern Queens, Northwestern Suffolk, Richmond (Staten Island), Southeastern Suffolk, Southern Fairfield, Southern Middlesex, Southern Nassau, Southern New Haven, Southern New London, Southern Queens, Southern Westchester, Southwestern Suffolk, Western Bergen, Western Essex, and Western Union * CURRENT WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Bronx, Eastern Bergen, Eastern Essex, Eastern Passaic, Eastern Union, Hudson, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Northeastern Suffolk, Northern Nassau, Northern Queens, Northwestern Suffolk, Richmond (Staten Island), Southeastern Suffolk, Southern Fairfield, Southern Middlesex, Southern Nassau, Southern New Haven, Southern New London, Southern Queens, Southern Westchester, Southwestern Suffolk, Western Bergen, Western Essex, and Western Union - A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for Northern Fairfield, Northern Middlesex, Northern New Haven, Northern New London, Northern Westchester, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, and Western Passaic * STORM INFORMATION: - About 830 miles south-southwest of New York City NY or about 900 miles south-southwest of Montauk Point NY - 29.7N 79.9W - Storm Intensity 70 mph - Movement North or 355 degrees at 9 mph SITUATION OVERVIEW ------------------ Tropical Storm Isaias, located off the north Florida coast, will continue to move to the north this morning, turning north-northeast this afternoon along the southeast coast. Isaias will continue moving northeast tonight over Eastern North Carolina. Isaias will slowly weaken as it accelerates northeast on Tuesday, likely moving over our area Tuesday afternoon and evening. There is still some timing and intensity uncertainty with this storm. However, confidence continues to increase with respect to the magnitude of local hazards and impacts. The main threats with this system involve heavy rainfall, strong winds, minor to moderate coastal flooding, along with high surf and dangerous rip currents. Locally heavy rain is expected with a widespread 2 to 4 inches, with localized amounts up to 6 inches possible. The heaviest rain is most likely to occur across New York City, Northeast New Jersey and the Lower Hudson Valley early Tuesday morning through Tuesday evening, and eastern sections Tuesday afternoon into Tuesday night. The strongest winds are likely to occur across Long Island, coastal Connecticut, and the New York City Metro. Dangerous marine conditions are likely across all of the coastal waters Tuesday and Tuesday night. High surf and dangerous rip currents are expected along the ocean beaches Monday through Wednesday. The effects from Tropical Storm Isaias are expected to diminish quickly from southwest to northeast across the area Tuesday night into Wednesday morning. POTENTIAL IMPACTS ----------------- * FLOODING RAIN: Protect against life-threatening rainfall flooding having possible extensive impacts across northeastern New Jersey, New York City, and the Lower Hudson Valley. Potential impacts include: - Major rainfall flooding may prompt many evacuations and rescues. - Rivers and streams may rapidly overflow their banks in multiple places. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches may become dangerous rivers. Flood control systems and barriers may become stressed. - In hilly terrain, destructive runoff may run quickly down valleys, and increase susceptibility to rockslides and mudslides. - Flood waters can enter many structures within multiple communities, some structures becoming uninhabitable or washed away. Many places where flood waters may cover escape routes. Streets and parking lots become rivers of moving water with underpasses submerged. Driving conditions become dangerous. Many road and bridge closures with some weakened or washed out. * WIND: Protect against dangerous wind having possible significant impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - Some damage to roofing and siding materials, along with damage to porches, awnings, carports, and sheds. A few buildings experiencing window, door, and garage door failures. Mobile homes damaged, especially if unanchored. Unsecured lightweight objects become dangerous projectiles. - Several large trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Several fences and roadway signs blown over. - Some roads impassable from large debris, and more within urban or heavily wooded places. A few bridges, causeways, and access routes impassable. - Scattered power and communications outages, but more prevalent in areas with above ground lines. * SURGE: Protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited impacts across shoreline communities. Potential impacts in this area include: - There is potential for widespread minor to locally moderate coastal flooding across the Lower New York Harbor and South Shore Back Bays, with localized minor flooding impacts elsewhere. - Localized inundation with storm surge flooding mainly along immediate shorelines and in low lying spots. - Sections of near shore roads and parking lots become overspread with surge water. Driving conditions dangerous in places where surge water covers the road. - Moderate beach erosion. Heavy surf also breaching dunes, mainly in usually vulnerable locations. Strong and frequent rip currents. - Minor to locally moderate damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers. A few small craft broken away from moorings. * TORNADOES: Protect against a tornado event having possible limited impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - The occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution of emergency plans during tropical events. - A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power and communications disruptions. - Locations could realize roofs peeled off buildings, chimneys toppled, mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned, large tree tops and branches snapped off, shallow rooted trees knocked over, moving vehicles blown off roads, and small boats pulled from moorings.

Governor Cuomo Announces Statewide Initiative to Combat Heroin Use

LongIsland.com

100 experienced investigators to be added to State Police narcotics unit, nearly doubling enforcement personnel.

Print Email

Albany, NY - June 11, 2014 - Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced a statewide initiative to combat the rise of heroin use. The multi-faceted approach includes the addition of 100 experienced investigators to the State Police Community Narcotics Enforcement Team (CNET), nearly doubling the number of troopers currently serving in the unit in order to more aggressively combat heroin trafficking. Additionally, the State will launch an unprecedented effort to make supplies of naloxone, a leading overdose antidote, available to all first responder units in the State. The Governor also announced a targeted awareness campaign that will take place on all public college and university campuses.

“Today, New York State is taking a major step forward in the fight against heroin. By nearly doubling the State Police’s drug enforcement units with the addition of more than 100 seasoned investigators we are going above and beyond to combat this deadly drug,” Governor Cuomo said. “Additionally, providing supplies of naloxone to all first responder units and raising awareness through our SUNY and CUNY campuses will save lives in communities across the State.”

There are five regional CNETs deployed across the state to assist local police with areas blighted by drug trafficking and related street crimes. Through CNET, specially trained State Police undercover narcotics enforcement personnel are available upon request to assist any police agencies north of New York City. CNET personnel fill a critical void for many rural, suburban and small city police departments, which typically lack the personnel or resources to maintain their own trained undercover narcotics units.

The addition of 100 experienced investigators will enable the CNET units to combat heroin trafficking and cases on a wider scale, including by conducting more long term and sophisticated cases, deploying an increased number of undercover personnel, and expanding successful K-9 units dedicated to CNET.

State Police Superintendent Joseph D’Amico said, “Heroin use, heroin sales and related heroin drug overdoses have become a widespread problem that simply must be addressed. A crisis this large must be combated on all fronts. I am pleased that the Governor has committed the necessary resources needed to meet that challenge.”

Naloxone is an emergency treatment that blocks the effects of opioids on the body, and can reverse the effects of an overdose. It works by temporarily reversing the effects of the opioid, whether illicit or prescription, allowing the individual to regain consciousness and resume normal breathing. When administered to a person suffering an opioid overdose, naloxone can reverse the overdose in a matter of minutes in a vast majority of cases saving the lives of those involved. It poses no danger to persons who otherwise might come into contact with it and it is not the kind of medication that can be abused.

In addition to the increased State Police presence, the Governor also announced the launch of an awareness and support campaign involving all SUNY campuses that includes:

  • Making heroin and opioid awareness part of every incoming student orientation, as well as at other key moments in students’ college experience;
  • Training all resident assistants and other support staff who deal with students on a regular basis in the warning signs of possible prescription drug or heroin abuse, including recognizing the risk factors and signs of heroin and opioid abuse when they seem them and clearing up misconceptions about the signs and severity of heroin and opioid use and abuse;
  • Ensuring that all students who are seeking treatment for prescription drug or heroin abuse receive all necessary services, including through the launch of a hotline/textline and encouraging anonymous and no-fault reporting when someone needs help;
  • State Police will assist all University Police and community college law enforcement departments on trafficking patterns, signs of prescription drug and heroin abuse, and best practices in handling those believed to be under the influence of either substance, and;
  • Training University police and health centers in how to administer naloxone and ensuring access to a supply for use by trained staff.

“Increased awareness of the dangers related to heroin use and other narcotics is an essential component in any effort to effectively combat drug abuse and its effects on our young people,” said SUNY Chancellor Nancy L. Zimpher. “The State University of New York is proud to be a part of the Governor’s initiative and thankful for the additional resources as our University Police and campus administrations and staff continue to support our students while ensuring their health and safety.”

Heroin is a highly addictive depressant, with users representing a variety of ages, races and other backgrounds. Fatal overdose, the contraction of HIV/AIDS and addiction and dependence are among a plethora of negative side effects that can result from heroin use. In addition to physical danger, heroin use threatens a user’s social life – often straining family bonds, friendships and professional relationships.

Across the nation, heroin abuse has been increasing at dangerously high rates in recent years. In 2013, there were 89,269 cases of heroin and prescription opiate treatment admissions in New York State alone, an increase from 63,793 in 2004. During this same time period, the drug also disproportionately impacted New Yorkers ranging in age from 18 to 24. Nationally, as many as 467,000 people were reportedly abusing heroin or suffering from heroin dependence in 2012. 

Watch live streaming video from newyorkstateofficeofthegovernor at livestream.com
Image via Andrew Cuomo on Flickr