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TROPICAL STORM WARNING IN EFFECT A Tropical Storm Warning means tropical storm-force winds are expected somewhere within this area within the next 36 hours * LOCATIONS AFFECTED - Huntington - Smithtown - Port Jefferson * WIND - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: Equivalent Tropical Storm force wind - Peak Wind Forecast: 40-50 mph with gusts to 70 mph - Window for Tropical Storm force winds: Tuesday afternoon until Tuesday evening - THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY THAT INCLUDES TYPICAL FORECAST UNCERTAINTY IN TRACK, SIZE AND INTENSITY: Potential for wind 58 to 73 mph - The wind threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - PLAN: Plan for dangerous wind of equivalent strong tropical storm force. - PREPARE: Remaining efforts to protect life and property should be completed as soon as possible. Prepare for significant wind damage. - ACT: Move to safe shelter before the wind becomes hazardous. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Significant - Some damage to roofing and siding materials, along with damage to porches, awnings, carports, and sheds. A few buildings experiencing window, door, and garage door failures. Mobile homes damaged, especially if unanchored. Unsecured lightweight objects become dangerous projectiles. - Several large trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Several fences and roadway signs blown over. - Some roads impassable from large debris, and more within urban or heavily wooded places. A few bridges, causeways, and access routes impassable. - Scattered power and communications outages, but more prevalent in areas with above ground lines. * STORM SURGE - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: Localized storm surge possible - Peak Storm Surge Inundation: The potential for up to 2 feet above ground somewhere within surge prone areas - Window of concern: Tuesday afternoon until early Wednesday morning - THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY THAT INCLUDES TYPICAL FORECAST UNCERTAINTY IN TRACK, SIZE AND INTENSITY: Potential for storm surge flooding greater than 1 foot above ground - The storm surge threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - PLAN: Plan for storm surge flooding greater than 1 foot above ground. - PREPARE: Complete preparations for storm surge flooding, especially in low-lying vulnerable areas, before conditions become unsafe. - ACT: Leave immediately if evacuation orders are given for your area. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Limited - Localized inundation with storm surge flooding mainly along immediate shorelines and in low lying spots, or in areas farther inland near where higher surge waters move ashore. - Sections of near shore roads and parking lots become overspread with surge water. Driving conditions dangerous in places where surge water covers the road. - Moderate beach erosion. Heavy surf also breaching dunes, mainly in usually vulnerable locations. Strong and frequent rip currents. - Minor to locally moderate damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers. A few small craft broken away from moorings. * FLOODING RAIN - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: - Peak Rainfall Amounts: Additional 1-3 inches, with locally higher amounts - THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY THAT INCLUDES TYPICAL FORECAST UNCERTAINTY IN TRACK, SIZE AND INTENSITY: Potential for moderate flooding rain - The flooding rain threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - PLAN: Emergency plans should include the potential for moderate flooding from heavy rain. Evacuations and rescues are possible. - PREPARE: Consider protective actions if you are in an area vulnerable to flooding. - ACT: Heed any flood watches and warnings. Failure to take action may result in serious injury or loss of life. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Significant - Moderate rainfall flooding may prompt several evacuations and rescues. - Rivers and streams may quickly become swollen with swifter currents and may overspill their banks in a few places, especially in usually vulnerable spots. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches may overflow. - Flood waters can enter some structures or weaken foundations. Several places may experience expanded areas of rapid inundation at underpasses, low lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Some streets and parking lots take on moving water as storm drains and retention ponds overflow. Driving conditions become hazardous. Some road and bridge closures. * TORNADO - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: - Situation is somewhat favorable for tornadoes - THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY THAT INCLUDES TYPICAL FORECAST UNCERTAINTY IN TRACK, SIZE AND INTENSITY: Potential for a few tornadoes - The tornado threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - PLAN: Emergency plans should include the potential for a few tornadoes. - PREPARE: If your shelter is particularly vulnerable to tornadoes, prepare to relocate to safe shelter before hazardous weather arrives. - ACT: If a tornado warning is issued, be ready to shelter quickly. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Limited - The occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution of emergency plans during tropical events. - A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power and communications disruptions. - Locations could realize roofs peeled off buildings, chimneys toppled, mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned, large tree tops and branches snapped off, shallow rooted trees knocked over, moving vehicles blown off roads, and small boats pulled from moorings. * FOR MORE INFORMATION: - http://scoem.suffolkcountyny.gov - https://weather.gov/nyc - https://ready.gov/hurricanes

Infant Treated for Rare Lung Disorder at Good Samaritan Hospital

LongIsland.com

Dr. Jones credits the combined efforts of the entire Good Samaritan team with Grant's accurate diagnosis, treatment and recovery - full details inside.

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West Islip, NY - April 17th, 2013 - Congenital lobar emphysema (CLE) is an extremely rare lung condition affecting fewer than one in 20,000 babies. Unfortunately, four-month-old Grant Denning beat those odds. Born five weeks early, Grant was hospitalized for respiratory distress several times in his first three months of life while his twin, Rowan was fine.

When Grant’s condition failed to improve, his parents brought him to Good Samaritan Hospital-affiliated pediatric pulmonologist Louis E. Guida, Jr., MD, who sent the family to Good Samaritan’s Pediatric Emergency Department. There, the baby was diagnosed with CLE, a condition that causes air to become trapped in one lobe of the lung. Surgery was recommended.

Vinci Jones, MD, Chief of Pediatric Surgery at Good Samaritan, performed a thoracic lobectomy to remove a lobe of Grant’s lung – a rare and delicate procedure in a four-month-old infant. In addition to Dr. Jones’ surgical skills, Grant benefited from the expertise of pediatric anesthesiologist Paul T. Scarola, DO, who kept him sedated throughout the X-hour procedure.

Grant spent more than four weeks recovering in Good Samaritan’s Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) where he was monitored by a team of pediatric specialists including Dimitry Vaysman, MD, pulmonologist with Good Samaritan’s Center for Pediatric Specialty Care, before being sent home with his grateful family. Dr. Jones says that Grant’s prognosis is excellent and he is expected to grow and develop normally alongside his twin brother.

“Our son’s treatment could not have gone any better,” said Donald Denning, who with is wife, Mary, is the father of four young boys. “It is a testament to what Good Sam has to offer. We understood the seriousness of the situation and put our son’s fate in their hands.”

Dr. Jones credits the combined efforts of the entire Good Samaritan team with Grant’s accurate diagnosis, treatment and recovery.

With the only pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) on Suffolk County’s South Shore, Good Samaritan is uniquely positioned to provide high-level care to children with serious illnesses and traumatic injuries. Physicians with subspecialty training in pediatric surgery, anesthesiology, pulmonology and critical care were essential members of the team. In addition, the PICU at Good Samaritan is staffed by registered nurses and nurse practitioners with additional training and experience in caring for critically ill infants and children. As part of the healing team, chaplains from the hospital’s Pastoral Care Department also contribute to the healing environment.

“When we were told that our child had a potentially critical condition and would need major surgery, we did not give it a second thought because we knew we were in the right place and had total confidence in the expertise of the surgeon, physicians and nurses at Good Sam,” said Mrs. Denning.

For further information on pediatric services at Good Samaritan visit www.good-samaritan-hospital.org or call (631) 376-4444.

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Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center is a 537-bed (including 100 nursing home beds), voluntary, not-for-profit hospital located in West Islip.  The medical center, which has more than 3,775 employees and 900 physicians on staff, had nearly 28,000 patient admissions and nearly 100,000 emergency department visits in 2012.  Good Samaritan is a member of Catholic Health Services of Long Island. Visit the website at www.good-samaritan-hospital.org.

Good Samaritan provided more than $43 million in community service and charity care in 2011.  The medical center supplies residents with the tools necessary to maintain good health.  This includes community lectures, screenings, health fairs and other community programs and services.

For More Information, Please Contact:
Colleen Valdini

Manager, Public and External Affairs
Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center
(631) 376-4483
(631) 376-3893 (fax)
colleen.valdini@chsli.org