Weather Alert  

TROPICAL STORM FAY TO BRING HEAVY RAINFALL, GUSTY WINDS, AND DANGEROUS SURF CONDITIONS This product covers Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut **TROPICAL STORM FAY TO BRING HEAVY RAINFALL, GUSTY WINDS, AND DANGEROUS SURF CONDITIONS** NEW INFORMATION --------------- * CHANGES TO WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - A Tropical Storm Warning has been issued for Bronx, Eastern Essex, Eastern Union, Hudson, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Northeastern Suffolk, Northern Nassau, Northern Queens, Northwestern Suffolk, Richmond (Staten Island), Southeastern Suffolk, Southern Fairfield, Southern Middlesex, Southern Nassau, Southern New Haven, Southern New London, Southern Queens, Southern Westchester, and Southwestern Suffolk * CURRENT WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Bronx, Eastern Essex, Eastern Union, Hudson, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Northeastern Suffolk, Northern Nassau, Northern Queens, Northwestern Suffolk, Richmond (Staten Island), Southeastern Suffolk, Southern Fairfield, Southern Middlesex, Southern Nassau, Southern New Haven, Southern New London, Southern Queens, Southern Westchester, and Southwestern Suffolk * STORM INFORMATION: - About 370 miles south of New York City NY or about 420 miles south-southwest of Montauk Point NY - 35.5N 74.9W - Storm Intensity 45 mph - Movement North or 360 degrees at 7 mph SITUATION OVERVIEW ------------------ Tropical Storm Fay located along North Carolina Outer Banks will move northward along the coast towards the area Friday and will make landfall near the New York City area Friday night. The main threats with this system will be locally heavy rainfall, the potential for flash flooding, and dangerous surf conditions Friday into Friday night. POTENTIAL IMPACTS ----------------- * FLOODING RAIN: Protect against dangerous rainfall flooding having possible significant impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - Moderate rainfall flooding may prompt several evacuations and rescues. - Rivers and streams may quickly become swollen with swifter currents and may overspill their banks in a few places, especially in usually vulnerable spots. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches may overflow. - Flood waters can enter some structures or weaken foundations. Several places may experience expanded areas of rapid inundation at underpasses, low lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Some streets and parking lots take on moving water as storm drains and retention ponds overflow. Driving conditions become hazardous. Some road and bridge closures. * WIND: Protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - Damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored mobile homes. Unsecured lightweight objects blown about. - Many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over. - A few roads impassable from debris, particularly within urban or heavily wooded places. Hazardous driving conditions on bridges and other elevated roadways. - Scattered power and communications outages. * TORNADOES: Protect against a tornado event having possible limited impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - The occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution of emergency plans during tropical events. - A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power and communications disruptions. - Locations could realize roofs peeled off buildings, chimneys toppled, mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned, large tree tops and branches snapped off, shallow rooted trees knocked over, moving vehicles blown off roads, and small boats pulled from moorings. * OTHER COASTAL HAZARDS: Beach flooding and localized dune erosion along the Atlantic Ocean beachfront are possible during the times of high tide Friday through Saturday. Low probability of minor coastal flooding in vulnerable coastal areas during the high tide on Friday night.

Summer pests

LongIsland.com

Summer is upon us once more and so are the summer pests. I've been getting a lot of calls about the latest infestation of cottony maple and cushion scale on a wide variety of plants. ...

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Summer is upon us once more and so are the summer pests. I've been getting a lot of calls about the latest infestation of cottony maple and cushion scale on a wide variety of plants. Late June and early July are the best times to control these pests since they are at their most vulnerable in the crawler stage. A low rate (1- 1 1/2 %) of horticultural oil or soap will suffocate these pests without doing damage to the plants. For a more natural approach I would recommend releasing Metaphycus helvolus, the soft scale parasitoid or Rhyzobius iophanthae, the singular black lady beetle a.k.a. the scale destroyer.
You should also be on the look out for the Azalea whitefly. Whiteflies will feed on Azaleas, Japanese hollies, Mountain laurels, Rhododendrons and Andromedas. You will know if you have this pest if you shake the plant and very tiny white specks start flying around. Soaps and oils (at the lowest rate) are effective against this pest, but you need to make sure that you are coating the undersides of the leaves completely, since this is where the whiteflies feed. You can also release Delphastus pusillus, the whitefly destroyer to control these pests.
Other destructive pest that you will see starting up at this time of year are Bagworms on Arborvitae and Pine sawflies on Pines. Both of these caterpillars can be devastating to the plants that they infest. I would recommend using a BT (Bacillus thuringiensis) to control these pests. The release of the mini wasp Trichgramma pretiosum, will control these pests very effectively.
Now is the best time to treat for spider mites on Alberta spruces, Hemlocks, Junipers, Spruces and Firs. Use a good quality miticide such as Kelthane or Floramite. Soaps and oils are also effective, but care must be taken when spraying blue spruces or junipers. The soap or oil can remove the blue waxy covering on these plants and turn then green for the rest of the season. The blue coloring will come back with the new growth next year. The natural control for mites is the all purpose predatory mite, Neoseiulus fallacies or the spider mite destroyer, Stethorus punctillum.
One of the biggest problems that our landscapes will be facing will not come from any insect or disease (although this problem will open the door for these pests). This problem is drought stress. The summers on Long Island, as you know, can be dry, humid and hot. This not only affects us but our plants as well. Make sure that that you are giving your landscapes enough water (your plants will need more than your lawn does) when we go into extended periods of no rainfall.
If you are interested in buying the beneficial insects that I have recommended I would recommend that you check out www.shopgreenmethods.com. They have a wide variety of beneficial insects as well as other biological controls.
As always, if you have any questions I would be happy to answer them. You can contact me at 631-691-2381 or 631-466-2930 or by E-mail at aplantdoctor@hotmail.com.