Weather Alert  

"Areal Flood Advisory" The National Weather Service in Upton NY has issued a * flood advisory for minor flooding in poor drainage areas for... western Suffolk County in southeastern New York... * until 200 PM EDT * at 1158 am EDT, Doppler radar indicated heavy rain due to thunderstorms. Overflowing poor drainage areas will result in minor flooding in the advisory area. Radar estimates that one half to one inch of rain has already fallen, and that additional rainfall of up to one half inch is likely. * Some locations that could experience flooding include... Islip, Shirley, Medford, Patchogue, Center Moriches, Holbrook, Bay shore, Sayville, Mastic, Yaphank, East Patchogue, North Bay Shore, East Islip, North Bellport and Bohemia. Precautionary/preparedness actions... Excessive runoff from heavy rainfall will cause flooding of urban areas, highways, streets and underpasses as well as other drainage areas and low lying spots. Lat...Lon 4070 7321 4075 7333 4085 7287 4080 7270 4074 7298 4074 7302 4073 7303 4071 7311 4072 7312 4070 7313 4069 7319 Goodman -- Tuesday Mar.28 17,01:24 PM

Cyanobacteria Blooms Occurring in Mattituck, Southampton and Montauk

Health officials ask residents not to use or swim or wade in these waters and to keep their pets and children away from the area.

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Montauk, NY - June 9, 2014 - The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has confirmed cyanobacteria blooms in Lake Maratooka in Mattituck, Lake Agawam in Southampton and Big Reed Pond in Montauk. Due to the finding of high levels of toxic cyanobacteria, more commonly known as blue–green algae, health officials ask residents not to use or swim or wade in these waters and to keep their pets and children away from the area.
 
Residents who have been recently exposed to cyanobacteria at these water bodies and have symptoms such as nausea, vomiting or diarrhea; skin, eye or throat irritation, allergic reactions or breathing difficulties are advised to seek medical attention. 
 
Though blue-green algae are naturally present in lakes and streams in low numbers, they can become abundant, forming blooms in shades of green, blue-green, yellow, brown or red. They may produce floating scums on the surface of the water or may cause the water to take on paint-like appearance.
 
Contact with waters that appear scummy or discolored should be avoided. If contact does occur, rinse off with clean water immediately, and if symptoms occur, such as nausea, vomiting or diarrhea; skin, eye or throat irritation, allergic reactions or breathing difficulties, seek medical attention. 
 
To report a suspected blue-green algae bloom at a body of water that contains a Suffolk County permitted bathing beach, contact the Suffolk County Department of Health Services’ Office of Ecology at 852-5760.
 
To report a suspected blue-green algae bloom that is in a body of water that does not contain a Suffolk County permitted bathing beach, contact the Division of Water at New York State Department of Environmental Conservation: (518) 402-8179.
 
For more information about blue-green algae, visit the Suffolk County website.