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Weather Alert(2)!
"Blizzard Warning" ...Blizzard Warning in effect from 1 PM Monday to midnight EST Tuesday night... The National Weather Service in New York has issued a Blizzard Warning...which is in effect from 1 PM Monday to midnight EST Tuesday night. The blizzard watch is no longer in effect. * Locations...New York City and surrounding immediate suburbs...Long Island...and most of southern Connecticut. * Hazard types...heavy snow and blowing snow...with blizzard conditions. * Accumulations...snow accumulation of 20 to 30 inches...with locally higher amounts possible. Snowfall rates of 2 to 4 inches per hour expected late Monday night into Tuesday morning. * Winds...north 30 to 40 mph with gusts 55 to 65 mph...strongest across eastern Long Island. * Visibilities...one quarter mile or less at times. * Temperatures...in the lower 20s. * Timing...light snow will begin Monday morning...with accumulations of 1 to 3 inches possible by the evening rush. Snow will pick up in intensity Monday evening...with the heaviest snow and strongest winds from about midnight Monday night into Tuesday afternoon. * Impacts...life-threatening conditions and extremely dangerous travel due to heavy snowfall and strong winds...with whiteout conditions. Secondary and tertiary roads may become impassable. Strong winds may down power lines and tree limbs. Precautionary/preparedness actions... A Blizzard Warning means severe winter weather conditions are expected or occurring. Falling and blowing snow with strong winds and poor visibilities will lead to whiteout conditions...making travel extremely dangerous. Do not travel. If you must travel...have a winter survival kit with you. If you get stranded...stay with your vehicle. All unnecessary travel is discouraged beginning Monday afternoon...to allow people already on the Road to safely reach their destinations before the heavy snow begins...and to allow snow removal equipment to begin to clear roads. , "Coastal Flood Watch" ...Coastal Flood Watch in effect from late Monday night through Tuesday morning... The National Weather Service in New York has issued a coastal Flood Watch...which is in effect from late Monday night through Tuesday morning. * Locations...low lying coastal areas along western Long Island Sound. * Tidal departures...most likely 3 to 4 ft of surge above astronomical tide. A low probability of 4 to 4 1/2 ft surge above astronomical tide. * Timing...during the times of high tide between 3 am and 6 am late Monday night into early Tuesday morning. * Beach erosion impacts...2 to 4 waves and high storm tide will cause beach erosion along north facing shorelines open to Long Island Sound. A few exposed water front structures may be damaged. * Coastal flooding impacts...potential for flooding of vulnerable shore roads and/or basements due to height of storm tide and/or wave action. Several shore Road closures may be needed. Precautionary/preparedness actions... A coastal Flood Watch means that conditions favorable for flooding are expected to develop. Coastal residents should be alert for later statements or warnings...and take action to protect property. ...Most likely western l.I. Sound water levels for Monday night/early Tuesday morning high tide... Coastal............time of......forecast total.....Flood..... Location...........high Tide.....Water level.......category.. ....................................(mllw)................... Kings Point NY......455 am........11.1-11.7.......moderate... Glen Cove NY........445 am........11.5-12.1.......moderate... Stamford CT.........436 am........11.1-11.7.......moderate... Bridgeport CT.......433 am........10.6-11.0.......moderate... New Haven CT........432 am.........9.5-10.1.......moderate... -- Sunday Jan.25 15,07:12 PM Weather  |  LIRR  |  Traffic  |  Traffic Cams |  Weather News

Long Island Railroad

The Long Island Rail Road or LIRR is a railroad that serves the length of Long Island, New York. It is the busiest commuter railroad in the United States, and the oldest railroad still operating under its original name. It is owned by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which has styled it MTA Long Island Rail Road.

The Long Island Rail Road operates seven days per week with service and branches from Manhattan to Montauk. Most of the Long Island railroad stations are open during normal business hours. Many of the stations are equipped with automated ticket machines so you can purchase your tickets before boarding the train. If you are running late, tickets can be purchased from train conductors.

24 Hour Travel Information Line - Train schedules, weather advisories and delays

  • For information about MTA Advisories & Delays for Suffolk County, Nassau County and all five boroughs, please call 718-217-5477.

    For information on all MTA Services, dial 511 for New York State's Transit & Traffic line. For information on the LIRR, say "Long Island Rail Road" when prompted.


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Long Island Rail Road History


The LIRR's history stretches back to 1832 and the Brooklyn and Jamaica Railroad, which built a ten mile (16 km) stretch of track between Brooklyn and Jamaica. The Long Island Rail Road itself was founded in 1834, leasing the track laid down by the B&J and building its own.

The original plan was not as a local service to serve Long Island, but rather a quicker route from Boston to New York. Trains would run from Boston to Stonington, Connecticut, where the passengers would cross by ferry to Long Island. They would then ride on the LIRR to Fulton Street in Brooklyn, and finally cross by ferry to New York. The reason for this rather complicated plan was the impossibility, at the time, of building a railroad through southern Connecticut.

The LIRR thus built its original tracks running straight down the middle of the island, which was largely uninhabited at the time, rather than serving the existing Long Island communities. This route was chosen as the most direct way to travel to New York.

Schedule for the first day of revenue operation, July 29, 1844. The Island-long route was completed in 1844 and at first was highly successful. However, in 1849 the New York and New Haven Railroad opened through the "impassable" country of southern Connecticut, and a direct overland route from New York to Boston now existed. The LIRR's reason for existence was gone.

The only remaining business was to serve Long Island itself, something the railroad was not built to do. Efforts were made to build branches to the small Long Island communities. In 1850 only one such branch existed, but more were built, as well as a number of other railroad companies' branches.

In 1860, the City of Brooklyn banned the use of steam engines in populated areas. The Long Island Rail Road reduced service to Brooklyn, eliminating the track between the current Flatbush Avenue terminal and the then Fulton Street terminal. Service between Jamaica Station and Flatbush Avenue was by horse drawn cars. The Long Island Rail Road built the route from Jamaica Station via Woodside Station to the Long Island City terminal where ferry connections to Manhattan could be made. This route was entirely within Queens County, and avoided the Brooklyn law. Since that time, the routes to Brooklyn have always been considered secondary.

The combination of the loss of the New York to Boston traffic and all the competing railroads made for harsh financial times for both the LIRR and the newer roads. In 1876, the LIRR was bought out by the owner of one of the competing roads, but the Long Island Rail Road name was used for the merged company. Even consolidation could not prevent another receivership in 1879, however.

The road was purchased by Austin Corbin in 1880 and further building took place. By 1900, the LIRR had reached the limits of its expansion. During this period the road was profitable.

In 1901 the Pennsylvania Railroad acquired the Long Island Rail Road and went about an extensive program of improvements. The PRR had long desired a terminal on Manhattan Island itself, instead of in Jersey City. The PRR built a grand station, Pennsylvania Station, with tracks oriented approximately east-west, and dug two sets of tunnels, one under the Hudson River to connect the new station with the Pennsylvania Railroad network, and another set under the East River to connect with the Long Island Rail Road.

In April 1905, Ralph Peters was elected president of the railroad.

Due to a fatal accident caused by decreased visibility from smoke and steam in the tunnels near Grand Central Terminal, New York City passed laws in 1910 forbidding the operation of steam-powered trains within city limits. Thus, an ambitious program of electrification was initiated, culminating in a large portion of the LIRR's network being electrified via a third rail direct current system. This electrification is still in use today.

After the Second World War, the LIRR became an increasing financial burden on the Pennsylvania Railroad, and eventually became bankrupt. It was purchased by the State of New York and is now a subsidiary of the New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA).

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