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TROPICAL STORM WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT * LOCATIONS AFFECTED - Huntington - Smithtown - Port Jefferson * WIND - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: Equivalent Tropical Storm force wind - Peak Wind Forecast: 40-50 mph with gusts to 70 mph - Window for Tropical Storm force winds: Tuesday afternoon until Tuesday evening - THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY THAT INCLUDES TYPICAL FORECAST UNCERTAINTY IN TRACK, SIZE AND INTENSITY: Potential for wind 58 to 73 mph - The wind threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - PLAN: Plan for dangerous wind of equivalent strong tropical storm force. - PREPARE: Remaining efforts to protect life and property should be completed as soon as possible. Prepare for significant wind damage. - ACT: Move to safe shelter before the wind becomes hazardous. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Significant - Some damage to roofing and siding materials, along with damage to porches, awnings, carports, and sheds. A few buildings experiencing window, door, and garage door failures. Mobile homes damaged, especially if unanchored. Unsecured lightweight objects become dangerous projectiles. - Several large trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Several fences and roadway signs blown over. - Some roads impassable from large debris, and more within urban or heavily wooded places. A few bridges, causeways, and access routes impassable. - Scattered power and communications outages, but more prevalent in areas with above ground lines. * STORM SURGE - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: Localized storm surge possible - Peak Storm Surge Inundation: The potential for 1-3 feet above ground somewhere within surge prone areas - Window of concern: Tuesday afternoon until early Wednesday morning - THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY THAT INCLUDES TYPICAL FORECAST UNCERTAINTY IN TRACK, SIZE AND INTENSITY: Potential for storm surge flooding greater than 1 foot above ground - The storm surge threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - PLAN: Plan for storm surge flooding greater than 1 foot above ground. - PREPARE: Complete preparations for storm surge flooding, especially in low-lying vulnerable areas, before conditions become unsafe. - ACT: Leave immediately if evacuation orders are given for your area. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Limited - Localized inundation with storm surge flooding mainly along immediate shorelines and in low lying spots, or in areas farther inland near where higher surge waters move ashore. - Sections of near shore roads and parking lots become overspread with surge water. Driving conditions dangerous in places where surge water covers the road. - Moderate beach erosion. Heavy surf also breaching dunes, mainly in usually vulnerable locations. Strong and frequent rip currents. - Minor to locally moderate damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers. A few small craft broken away from moorings. * FLOODING RAIN - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: - Peak Rainfall Amounts: Additional 1-3 inches, with locally higher amounts - THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY THAT INCLUDES TYPICAL FORECAST UNCERTAINTY IN TRACK, SIZE AND INTENSITY: Potential for moderate flooding rain - The flooding rain threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - PLAN: Emergency plans should include the potential for moderate flooding from heavy rain. Evacuations and rescues are possible. - PREPARE: Consider protective actions if you are in an area vulnerable to flooding. - ACT: Heed any flood watches and warnings. Failure to take action may result in serious injury or loss of life. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Significant - Moderate rainfall flooding may prompt several evacuations and rescues. - Rivers and streams may quickly become swollen with swifter currents and may overspill their banks in a few places, especially in usually vulnerable spots. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches may overflow. - Flood waters can enter some structures or weaken foundations. Several places may experience expanded areas of rapid inundation at underpasses, low lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Some streets and parking lots take on moving water as storm drains and retention ponds overflow. Driving conditions become hazardous. Some road and bridge closures. * TORNADO - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: - Situation is somewhat favorable for tornadoes - THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY THAT INCLUDES TYPICAL FORECAST UNCERTAINTY IN TRACK, SIZE AND INTENSITY: Potential for a few tornadoes - The tornado threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - PLAN: Emergency plans should include the potential for a few tornadoes. - PREPARE: If your shelter is particularly vulnerable to tornadoes, prepare to relocate to safe shelter before hazardous weather arrives. - ACT: If a tornado warning is issued, be ready to shelter quickly. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Limited - The occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution of emergency plans during tropical events. - A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power and communications disruptions. - Locations could realize roofs peeled off buildings, chimneys toppled, mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned, large tree tops and branches snapped off, shallow rooted trees knocked over, moving vehicles blown off roads, and small boats pulled from moorings. * FOR MORE INFORMATION: - http://scoem.suffolkcountyny.gov - https://weather.gov/nyc - https://ready.gov/hurricanes

New Legislation Prohibits Suffolk Kids From Purchasing Energy Drinks

LongIsland.com

Despite fierce resistance by the beverage industry, Suffolk lawmakers Tuesday night approved three bills, sponsored by Legis. William Spencer (D-Centerport), that will prohibit the sale of energy drinks to kids under 18 at county parks ...

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Despite fierce resistance by the beverage industry, Suffolk lawmakers Tuesday night approved three bills, sponsored by Legis. William Spencer (D-Centerport) that will prohibit the sale of energy drinks to kids under 18 at county parks and beaches.

The legislation, that Spencer is calling the “nation's first comprehensive energy/stimulant education and protection plan,” would also limit direct marketing efforts of these products to minors.

The ban on the sale of energy drinks at county parks and beaches passed 11-4, with several abstentions; the ban on marketing the drinks to minors through coupons and free-samples passed 16-0; and a measure that encourages local students to submit videos about the alleged health dangers of the drinks was approved 14-1.

“Far too many people are unaware of the effects excessive caffeine consumption can have on the body,” Spencer said. “Excessive consumption of caffeine can aggravate pre-existing conditions and contribute to a variety of health problems. My plan levels the playing field and will create an open and fair dialogue about these products so parents and children can decide whether or not to ingest these drinks.”

Health advocates say energy drinks, which contain the additives guarana and taurine, among others, can cause elevated heart rates, higher blood pressure, dizziness and even death.

The beverage industry strongly disagrees, saying the drinks contain less caffeine than similar servings of coffee, and that their additives don't enhance the caffeine effects to dangerous levels.

Matthew Vishnick, a lobbyist representing 5-Hour Energy, called the ban "unconstitutional and unjustified," and said the drinks contain no banned substances and could be safer than the hot dogs sold at parks. He called opposing studies inconclusive and added, “If energy drinks were so harmful, we'd have definitive evidence."

The new measures will prohibit concession stands at county-owned parks, along with vendors selling food and drinks at summer events held at county parks, from selling the popular energy drinks to minors. County-owned golf courses will be subject to the same regulations.

The legislation also prohibits energy drink companies from marketing to minors by providing free samples or coupons to children at sports tournaments, concerts or other special events held anywhere throughout Suffolk.

The bill also calls for the enactment of “The Truth About Stimulant Drinks” program, asking middle school and high school students to participate in a competition to create a public safety announcement on the dangers of energy drinks. The winning submission will air on a local cable television channel.

Legis. Lynne Nowick (R-St. James) introduced a measure in 2010 aimed at banning the sale of all energy drinks to minors countywide but withdrew it after the industry agreed to label its products as not being recommended for children.

"This is the beginning," Nowick said Tuesday. "There is much more that we can do."

The legislation becomes effective within 60 days of being signed by County Executive Steve Bellone and being filed with the state.

What’s your opinion? We’d like to know. Please include your comments below or on our Long Island Discussion Forum.

 

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