Weather Alert  

TROPICAL STORM WARNING IN EFFECT A Tropical Storm Warning means tropical storm-force winds are expected somewhere within this area within the next 36 hours * LOCATIONS AFFECTED - Huntington - Smithtown - Port Jefferson * WIND - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: Equivalent Tropical Storm force wind - Peak Wind Forecast: 40-50 mph with gusts to 70 mph - Window for Tropical Storm force winds: Tuesday afternoon until Tuesday evening - THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY THAT INCLUDES TYPICAL FORECAST UNCERTAINTY IN TRACK, SIZE AND INTENSITY: Potential for wind 58 to 73 mph - The wind threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - PLAN: Plan for dangerous wind of equivalent strong tropical storm force. - PREPARE: Remaining efforts to protect life and property should be completed as soon as possible. Prepare for significant wind damage. - ACT: Move to safe shelter before the wind becomes hazardous. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Significant - Some damage to roofing and siding materials, along with damage to porches, awnings, carports, and sheds. A few buildings experiencing window, door, and garage door failures. Mobile homes damaged, especially if unanchored. Unsecured lightweight objects become dangerous projectiles. - Several large trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Several fences and roadway signs blown over. - Some roads impassable from large debris, and more within urban or heavily wooded places. A few bridges, causeways, and access routes impassable. - Scattered power and communications outages, but more prevalent in areas with above ground lines. * STORM SURGE - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: Localized storm surge possible - Peak Storm Surge Inundation: The potential for up to 2 feet above ground somewhere within surge prone areas - Window of concern: Tuesday afternoon until early Wednesday morning - THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY THAT INCLUDES TYPICAL FORECAST UNCERTAINTY IN TRACK, SIZE AND INTENSITY: Potential for storm surge flooding greater than 1 foot above ground - The storm surge threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - PLAN: Plan for storm surge flooding greater than 1 foot above ground. - PREPARE: Complete preparations for storm surge flooding, especially in low-lying vulnerable areas, before conditions become unsafe. - ACT: Leave immediately if evacuation orders are given for your area. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Limited - Localized inundation with storm surge flooding mainly along immediate shorelines and in low lying spots, or in areas farther inland near where higher surge waters move ashore. - Sections of near shore roads and parking lots become overspread with surge water. Driving conditions dangerous in places where surge water covers the road. - Moderate beach erosion. Heavy surf also breaching dunes, mainly in usually vulnerable locations. Strong and frequent rip currents. - Minor to locally moderate damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers. A few small craft broken away from moorings. * FLOODING RAIN - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: - Peak Rainfall Amounts: Additional 1-3 inches, with locally higher amounts - THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY THAT INCLUDES TYPICAL FORECAST UNCERTAINTY IN TRACK, SIZE AND INTENSITY: Potential for moderate flooding rain - The flooding rain threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - PLAN: Emergency plans should include the potential for moderate flooding from heavy rain. Evacuations and rescues are possible. - PREPARE: Consider protective actions if you are in an area vulnerable to flooding. - ACT: Heed any flood watches and warnings. Failure to take action may result in serious injury or loss of life. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Significant - Moderate rainfall flooding may prompt several evacuations and rescues. - Rivers and streams may quickly become swollen with swifter currents and may overspill their banks in a few places, especially in usually vulnerable spots. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches may overflow. - Flood waters can enter some structures or weaken foundations. Several places may experience expanded areas of rapid inundation at underpasses, low lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Some streets and parking lots take on moving water as storm drains and retention ponds overflow. Driving conditions become hazardous. Some road and bridge closures. * TORNADO - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: - Situation is somewhat favorable for tornadoes - THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY THAT INCLUDES TYPICAL FORECAST UNCERTAINTY IN TRACK, SIZE AND INTENSITY: Potential for a few tornadoes - The tornado threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - PLAN: Emergency plans should include the potential for a few tornadoes. - PREPARE: If your shelter is particularly vulnerable to tornadoes, prepare to relocate to safe shelter before hazardous weather arrives. - ACT: If a tornado warning is issued, be ready to shelter quickly. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Limited - The occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution of emergency plans during tropical events. - A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power and communications disruptions. - Locations could realize roofs peeled off buildings, chimneys toppled, mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned, large tree tops and branches snapped off, shallow rooted trees knocked over, moving vehicles blown off roads, and small boats pulled from moorings. * FOR MORE INFORMATION: - http://scoem.suffolkcountyny.gov - https://weather.gov/nyc - https://ready.gov/hurricanes

Guide to Hiking the Greenbelt Trail System

LongIsland.com

Take your New Year's resolutions seriously when you take a hike on the Long Island Greenbelt Trail, or the other trails in the greenbelt system.

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If you want to go out and get working on that New Year’s resolution of getting fit and getting outside, consider exploring Long Island’s major hiking trail system – the Greenbelt.  Long Island’s Greenbelt Trail is a 31.8-mile hiking trail that was completed in 1982 and extends from Sunken Meadow State Park on the Long Island Sound to Heckscher State Park on the Great South Bay.  After the original Long Island Greenbelt was completed, the Long Island Greenbelt Trail Conference made the push to create several more “greenbelt” trails across Long Island, each running north to south Though hiking on Long Island may seem simple due to the largely flat topography, there are all different kinds of terrain to cover, including various types of forests, pine barrens, beaches, and marshes. Though it is general ranked as an “easy” trail for hiking, it is best to know what you are getting into before hiking several miles or more.  Have appropriate hiking footwear, such as supportive sneakers or hiking boots, and some water at the ready in addition to these tips before you hit the trails!

The Different Greenbelt Trails:  Since there is more than one greenbelt trail, you can find which one best suits your ability level, and also choose to hike close to home or further away.

  • Long Island Greenbelt Trail: The original 31.8-mile Greenbelt takes you through deciduous forests and beaches, as well as some marshy areas and even residential neighborhoods toward the middle of the island.
  • Nassau-Suffolk Trail: This 20-mile trail extends from Cold Spring Harbor and Massapequa Preserve watershed, and also connects with the Walt Whitman Trail. Mountain bikers can also take to this trail, which has biking paths that run parallel to the trail so as to avoid hikers.
  • Walt Whitman Trail: Start at the famous poet’s birthplace in South Huntington through West Hills County Park.  There is a 3.7 mile loop trail that begins and ends at the Sweet Hollow Road picnic area. This trail also includes Jayne’s Hill, the highest location on Long Island that gives a beautiful view of the ocean.
  • Long Island Seashore Trail: This unique trail goes through New York’s only Federal Wilderness Area near Smith’s Point.  The path is open but unblazed, so maps are a must.
  • Pine Barrens Trail: Hike through the nation’s second-largest pine barrens on a 47-mile route from Rocky Point to Hampton Bays.  The woodlands here are pristine, and it also passes through many scenic ponds.

State Parks Along the Way: The Long Island Greenbelt Trail intersects with several major state parks where you can plan to start or end your travels:

Wheelchair-Accessible Nature:  Though hiking trails are not often wheelchair accessible, part of the Pine Barrens Greenbelt is flat and wide enough to go out in a wheelchair – El’s Wampmissick, a .75-mile stretch of trail through the classic pine barrens terrain.