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TROPICAL STORM ISAIAS MOVING NORTHWARD ALONG THE EAST COAST This product covers Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut **TROPICAL STORM ISAIAS MOVING NORTHWARD ALONG THE EAST COAST** NEW INFORMATION --------------- * CHANGES TO WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - None * CURRENT WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for Bronx, Eastern Bergen, Eastern Essex, Eastern Passaic, Eastern Union, Hudson, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Northeastern Suffolk, Northern Fairfield, Northern Middlesex, Northern Nassau, Northern New Haven, Northern New London, Northern Queens, Northern Westchester, Northwestern Suffolk, Richmond (Staten Island), Rockland, Southeastern Suffolk, Southern Fairfield, Southern Middlesex, Southern Nassau, Southern New Haven, Southern New London, Southern Queens, Southern Westchester, Southwestern Suffolk, Western Bergen, Western Essex, Western Passaic, and Western Union * STORM INFORMATION: - About 910 miles south-southwest of New York City NY or about 980 miles south-southwest of Montauk Point NY - 28.5N 79.8W - Storm Intensity 70 mph - Movement North-northwest or 345 degrees at 9 mph SITUATION OVERVIEW ------------------ Tropical Storm Isaias, located off the East-Central Florida coast will continue to move to the north-northwest, then turn due north late tonight. It will continue to move north on Monday along the Southeastern US Coast. Isaias will then weaken slowly as it accelerates and curves northeast over the Carolinas Tuesday morning, then over our area by Tuesday evening. Confidence is increasing with respect to the magnitude of local hazards and impacts. The main threats with this system are locally heavy rainfall, strong winds, minor to moderate coastal flooding, along with high surf and dangerous rip currents. Locally heavy rain is expected with a widespread 2 to 4 inches likely, with localized amounts up to 6 inches possible. The heavy rain is most likely to occur across western parts of the area from late Monday night through Tuesday night, and eastern sections Tuesday into Tuesday night. The strongest winds are likely to occur across coastal sections late in the day Tuesday into Tuesday evening. Dangerous marine conditions are likely across all of the coastal waters Tuesday and Tuesday night. High surf and dangerous rip currents are expected along the ocean beaches Monday through Wednesday. The effects from Tropical Storm Isaias are then expected to diminish quickly from southwest to northeast across the area late Tuesday night into Wednesday morning. POTENTIAL IMPACTS ----------------- * FLOODING RAIN: Prepare for life-threatening rainfall flooding having possible extensive impacts across northeastern New Jersey, New York City and the Lower Hudson Valley. Potential impacts include: - Major rainfall flooding may prompt many evacuations and rescues. - Rivers and streams may rapidly overflow their banks in multiple places. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches may become dangerous rivers. Flood control systems and barriers may become stressed. - In hilly terrain, destructive runoff may run quickly down valleys, and increase susceptibility to rockslides and mudslides. - Flood waters can enter many structures within multiple communities, some structures becoming uninhabitable or washed away. Many places where flood waters may cover escape routes. Streets and parking lots become rivers of moving water with underpasses submerged. Driving conditions become dangerous. Many road and bridge closures with some weakened or washed out. * WIND: Prepare for hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - Damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored mobile homes. Unsecured lightweight objects blown about. - Many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over. - A few roads impassable from debris, particularly within urban or heavily wooded places. Hazardous driving conditions on bridges and other elevated roadways. - Scattered power and communications outages. * SURGE: Prepare for locally hazardous surge having possible limited impacts across shoreline communities. Potential impacts in this area include: - Localized inundation of 1 to 2 feet with locally up to 3 feet possible with storm surge flooding mainly along immediate shorelines and in low lying spots, or in areas farther inland near where higher surge waters move ashore. - Sections of near shore roads and parking lots become overspread with surge water. Driving conditions dangerous in places where surge water covers the road. - Moderate beach erosion. Heavy surf also breaching dunes, mainly in usually vulnerable locations. Strong and frequent rip currents. - Minor to locally moderate damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers. A few small craft broken away from moorings. * TORNADOES: Prepare for a tornado event having possible limited impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - The occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution of emergency plans during tropical events. - A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power and communications disruptions. - Locations could realize roofs peeled off buildings, chimneys toppled, mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned, large tree tops and branches snapped off, shallow rooted trees knocked over, moving vehicles blown off roads, and small boats pulled from moorings.

Mangano Announces Historic Public-Private Partnership to Operate County’s Wastewater Treatment Plants & Sewage System

LongIsland.com

United Water to Manage Infrastructure and Better Protect Environment through Improved Operations – $233 Million in Guaranteed Savings

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Nassau County, NY - June 30, 2014 - To better safeguard the environment, strengthen the quality of life in surrounding communities, improve facilities management and save taxpayers a minimum of $233.1 million,Nassau County Executive Edward P. Mangano today announced a public-private partnership with United Water – a national firm responsible for the safe and efficient operation of municipal water and wastewater systems across the United States – to manage and operate the County’s three wastewater treatment facilities and sewage system.
 
County Executive Mangano stated, “This partnership was formed to dramatically improve the County’s ability to protect our environment and the health and well-being of our residents. Together with United Water, we will implement unprecedented advances in environmental protection, odor control, management efficiencies, plant aesthetics and public information. Furthermore, this effort permits a more effective and efficient management of the plants and sewage system following the Federal government’s significant investment in storm hardening of our infrastructure.”
 
Mr. Bertrand Camus, Chief Executive Officer of United Water, said, “In municipalities across the country our firm has been entrusted with one of the most important assets of any community: its water supplies and sanitary sewage system. Every day we treat billions of gallons of water and we do it safely and effectively while bringing operational savings to the taxpayer. We intend to bring that record of performance to one of the most important suburban counties in the nation.”
 
County Executive Mangano noted, “The list of benefits provide an appreciation of just how strategic this agreement is for Nassau County. From nitrogen removal to protecting our marshlands, from establishing a new public park near one of the facilities to improving our ability to recover from future storms, we have the means of making these plants more environmentally friendly, more efficient and better stewards of our environment. Some of the benefits will be obvious to everyone, other improvements will be noticeable only to neighbors and still other improvements will be hidden behind technology and environmental metrics. Nevertheless, all residents and future generations will benefit regardless of where we live in Nassau County.”
 
Terms, Responsibilities and Savings
Under a 20year agreement, United Water is tasked with managing the County’s three treatment plants and sewage collection system: Bay Park in East Rockawaythat serves some 532,000 residents; Cedar Creek in Wantagh that serves 600,000 residents; and Glen Cove that serves 27,000 residents. Nassau County will maintain full ownership of the facilities while providing far greater environmental leadership and operational transparency.
 
United Water is responsible for the plants aroundthe clock with attention paid to not only managing their internal operations in a manner that protects the ecology of the surrounding wetlands and estuaries butthat alsomeets or surpassesthestrict Federal and State regulations for these types of facilities.
 
United Water will make it a priority to staff their County assignment with current County employees who are knowledgeable about the unique aspects of these facilities. During the transitional phase, the company will seek to permanently hire qualified County employees to work for United Water and thereby become part of the private sector. United Water also committed to utilize certain County sewer employees through its contract, at a guaranteed minimum of $10 million savings annually for Nassau taxpayers. These employees will remain with the County but will work with United Water to help improve the environmental efficiency of the wastewater and sewage systems.
 
The PFM Group, a Wall Street based financial consulting firm hired by Nassau to independently review the proposed agreement, found “On a present value basis this represents savings over the term of the contract of $233.1 million. When the additional financial benefits of the Synergy Savings– reduced overtime, County resumption of contracted services, and additional revenues resulting from personnel reassignments – are considered, the combined Contracted and Synergy Savings over the 20-year term rise to…$378.9 million.”
 
Immediate Implementation of Program
Mr. Camus stated that the United Water task is much more than simply assuming daily management of the three facilities and the sewage collection system, but implementing programs that United Water will immediately initiate to resolve significant major deficiencies. “We are prepared on ‘Day One’ to protect the public’s investment in these treatment plants by creating reliable systems that confront a myriad of significant issues.”
 
County oversight will be very much a part of the agreement with United Water providing written reports detailing operation and maintenance of the various systems on a monthly basis. The two parties will meet regularly to review operations and performance with County officials performing an inspection every year.
 
Every fifth year, there will be a full-scale inspection and review of the state of repair, working condition and performance capability of the three plants to permit the County to determine on a comprehensive and focused basis whether United Water is performing maintenance and meeting its obligations.
 
Support and Endorsements
The announcement was supported by a broad range of community and environmental advocacy groupsincluding Operation SPLASH, the Point Lookout Civic Association, the Nature Conservancy on Long Island, Concerned Citizens for the Environment, Sludge Stoppers Taskforce and the New York League of Conservation Voters.
 
Rob Weltner, President of Operation SPLASH, stated, “Knowing there is a direct connection between the performance of Nassau County's sewage treatment plants and the water quality of our bays and beaches means water treatment is something we need to be the absolute best at. We believe United Water will help us to achieve this goal by bringing worldwide experience and new technologies to our wastewater plants so that the residents and the sea life get what is deserved and that is the absolute best.”
 
Carl P. Lobue of the Nature Conservancy on Long Island observed, “Above all else, the Bay Park facility needs to be overhauled to reflect modern needs and technology. Clean water in the western bays depends on a modern, well-run facility with an ocean outfall to keep nitrogen pollution out of the local water. The choice of United Water as the manager of this facility is reason to hope for better water management outcomes for the western bays going forward.”
 
Michael Posillico, Board member and past Chairman of the Long Island chapter of the New York League of Conservation Voters, observed, “The County’s wastewater treatment infrastructure requires the immediate establishment of a comprehensive plan to maintain and exceed environmental compliance and protect the public’s health. This announcement places us on the road to recovery and operations efficiencies.”
 
The Association for a Better Long Island (ABLI), which represents $15 billion in commercial, industrial, retail and residential real estate, called the announcement, “a demonstration of smart government committed to reducing the cost of essential services by allowing private industry to do what it does best.” ABLI’s Executive Director Desmond Ryan said, “We look forward to the official transfer of the plant’s operations to United Water as it will provide a model for every municipality seeking to reduce its tax burden while protecting the environment.”
 
Ms. Adrienne Esposito, Executive Director of Citizens Campaign for the Environment (CCE), stated, “CCE fully supports the hiring of an established and highly experienced, qualified, professional contractor, specializing in wastewater treatment management. We believe this is an essential component for cleaner bays, estuaries and our ocean. It has become exceedingly clear the Bay Park Sewage Treatment Plant (STP), Cedar Creek and the Glen Cove STP must be operated by a management and engineering firm possessing a proven history of successfully operating and implementing advanced wastewater technology.”
 
“The re-engineering of the Bay Park STP provides a unique opportunity to employ modern treatment technologies that will improve the quality of its effluent; abate plant noise and odor in the adjacent communities; and recover and/or utilize waste resources. A professional, experienced contractor can ensure that these efforts are maximized. An experienced contractor brings global resources, technology and knowledge that cannot be found in the County. We believe a professional contractor, with community and County oversight, is the best safeguard for protecting public health, our groundwater and our waterways,” Esposito concluded.
 
Strength of United Water
United Water, based in Harrington Park, NJ, is one of the nation’s leading environmental companies, providing water and wastewater services to over 5.3 million people in the United States. In addition to owning and operating 16 water and wastewater utilities, United Water operates 84 municipal and industrial water and wastewater systems through innovative public-private partnerships and contract agreements. Founded in 1869, United Water provides water and wastewater services to nearly 2.5 million people in the New York metropolitan area and has access to more than 1,100 infrastructure professionals to support this region in the event of emergencies with additional manpower reserves located across the country.
 
Its parent company, Suez Environment, deals with the challenge of protecting resources by providing innovative solutions to millions of people. The company supplies drinking water to 92 million people, provides wastewater treatment services for 65 million people and collects the waste produced by 52 million people. Suez Environment employs 79,550 workers and, with its presence on five continents, is a world leader exclusively dedicated to water and waste management services.
 
Mr. Camus concluded, “We are now a proud, long-term partner with Nassau County, bringing accountability, guaranteed performance milestones, efficiencies and operational reliability so that we may save taxpayer dollars, protect the environment and improve the surrounding community’s quality of life.”