Officers Rescue Man and Woman from Rip Current at Ocean Bay Park

Two Suffolk County Police Marine Bureau officers rescued a man and woman from a rip current at Ocean Bay Park, Fire Island this afternoon.

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(left) Officer Anthony Sangimino and (right) Officer Michael Malone

Fire Island, NY - August 1, 2015 - Two Suffolk County Police Marine Bureau officers rescued a man and woman from a rip current at Ocean Bay Park, Fire Island this afternoon.                   

Elias Bahou and Katherine Robson were swimming in the ocean south of Oneida Street and Champlain Walk in Ocean Bay Park when they were caught in a rip current and swept out to sea. Onlookers called 911 for assistance at 2:17 p.m.

Officers Anthony Sangimino and Michael Malone were patrolling nearby and responded to the call of swimmers in distress. Both Sangimino and Malone entered the water with flotation devices to attempt a rescue. Sangimino reached the victims first and passed the flotation device to them. Sangimino and the two victims were still caught in the rip current and pulled from shore, so Sangimino advised the two to remain calm and wait until they were carried out of the rip. Once out of the rip, all three were able to swim to shore through the breaking waves. Bahou, Robson and Officer Sangimino were out of the water at approximately 2:45 p.m.

Surf height at the time of the rescue was approximately 4 feet and a National Weather Service advisory for strong rip currents was in effect.

Bahou, 29, of Huntington, and Robson, 30, of North Massapequa, were checked out by EMTs from the Ocean Beach Fire Department Ambulance and refused further medical attention.

Three men were rescued at Ocean Bay Park by Marine Bureau officers yesterday. Officer Malone assisted in that rescue as well.

The Marine Bureau advises swimmers to swim only on guarded beaches. If caught in a rip current, remember these survival tips:  

  • Keep calm. 
  • To get out of the rip current, swim parallel to the beach. 
  • When out of the rip current, swim at an angle away from the rip current and toward shore. 
  • If you can't escape this way, float or calmly tread water.