Weather Alert  

*TROPICAL STORM ISAIAS MOVING NORTHWARD ALONG THE EAST COAST* This product covers Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut ***TROPICAL STORM ISAIAS MOVING NORTHWARD ALONG THE EAST COAST*** NEW INFORMATION --------------- * CHANGES TO WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - A Tropical Storm Watch has been issued for Orange and Putnam - The Tropical Storm Watch has been upgraded to a Tropical Storm Warning for Bronx, Eastern Bergen, Eastern Essex, Eastern Passaic, Eastern Union, Hudson, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Northeastern Suffolk, Northern Nassau, Northern Queens, Northwestern Suffolk, Richmond (Staten Island), Southeastern Suffolk, Southern Fairfield, Southern Middlesex, Southern Nassau, Southern New Haven, Southern New London, Southern Queens, Southern Westchester, Southwestern Suffolk, Western Bergen, Western Essex, and Western Union * CURRENT WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Bronx, Eastern Bergen, Eastern Essex, Eastern Passaic, Eastern Union, Hudson, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Northeastern Suffolk, Northern Nassau, Northern Queens, Northwestern Suffolk, Richmond (Staten Island), Southeastern Suffolk, Southern Fairfield, Southern Middlesex, Southern Nassau, Southern New Haven, Southern New London, Southern Queens, Southern Westchester, Southwestern Suffolk, Western Bergen, Western Essex, and Western Union - A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for Northern Fairfield, Northern Middlesex, Northern New Haven, Northern New London, Northern Westchester, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, and Western Passaic * STORM INFORMATION: - About 830 miles south-southwest of New York City NY or about 900 miles south-southwest of Montauk Point NY - 29.7N 79.9W - Storm Intensity 70 mph - Movement North or 355 degrees at 9 mph SITUATION OVERVIEW ------------------ Tropical Storm Isaias, located off the north Florida coast, will continue to move to the north this morning, turning north-northeast this afternoon along the southeast coast. Isaias will continue moving northeast tonight over Eastern North Carolina. Isaias will slowly weaken as it accelerates northeast on Tuesday, likely moving over our area Tuesday afternoon and evening. There is still some timing and intensity uncertainty with this storm. However, confidence continues to increase with respect to the magnitude of local hazards and impacts. The main threats with this system involve heavy rainfall, strong winds, minor to moderate coastal flooding, along with high surf and dangerous rip currents. Locally heavy rain is expected with a widespread 2 to 4 inches, with localized amounts up to 6 inches possible. The heaviest rain is most likely to occur across New York City, Northeast New Jersey and the Lower Hudson Valley early Tuesday morning through Tuesday evening, and eastern sections Tuesday afternoon into Tuesday night. The strongest winds are likely to occur across Long Island, coastal Connecticut, and the New York City Metro. Dangerous marine conditions are likely across all of the coastal waters Tuesday and Tuesday night. High surf and dangerous rip currents are expected along the ocean beaches Monday through Wednesday. The effects from Tropical Storm Isaias are expected to diminish quickly from southwest to northeast across the area Tuesday night into Wednesday morning. POTENTIAL IMPACTS ----------------- * FLOODING RAIN: Protect against life-threatening rainfall flooding having possible extensive impacts across northeastern New Jersey, New York City, and the Lower Hudson Valley. Potential impacts include: - Major rainfall flooding may prompt many evacuations and rescues. - Rivers and streams may rapidly overflow their banks in multiple places. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches may become dangerous rivers. Flood control systems and barriers may become stressed. - In hilly terrain, destructive runoff may run quickly down valleys, and increase susceptibility to rockslides and mudslides. - Flood waters can enter many structures within multiple communities, some structures becoming uninhabitable or washed away. Many places where flood waters may cover escape routes. Streets and parking lots become rivers of moving water with underpasses submerged. Driving conditions become dangerous. Many road and bridge closures with some weakened or washed out. * WIND: Protect against dangerous wind having possible significant impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - Some damage to roofing and siding materials, along with damage to porches, awnings, carports, and sheds. A few buildings experiencing window, door, and garage door failures. Mobile homes damaged, especially if unanchored. Unsecured lightweight objects become dangerous projectiles. - Several large trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Several fences and roadway signs blown over. - Some roads impassable from large debris, and more within urban or heavily wooded places. A few bridges, causeways, and access routes impassable. - Scattered power and communications outages, but more prevalent in areas with above ground lines. * SURGE: Protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited impacts across shoreline communities. Potential impacts in this area include: - There is potential for widespread minor to locally moderate coastal flooding across the Lower New York Harbor and South Shore Back Bays, with localized minor flooding impacts elsewhere. - Localized inundation with storm surge flooding mainly along immediate shorelines and in low lying spots. - Sections of near shore roads and parking lots become overspread with surge water. Driving conditions dangerous in places where surge water covers the road. - Moderate beach erosion. Heavy surf also breaching dunes, mainly in usually vulnerable locations. Strong and frequent rip currents. - Minor to locally moderate damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers. A few small craft broken away from moorings. * TORNADOES: Protect against a tornado event having possible limited impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - The occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution of emergency plans during tropical events. - A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power and communications disruptions. - Locations could realize roofs peeled off buildings, chimneys toppled, mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned, large tree tops and branches snapped off, shallow rooted trees knocked over, moving vehicles blown off roads, and small boats pulled from moorings.

Suffolk Student Cassandra Nyati to Present Research Abstract to International Audience at National Conference in Lexington, Kentucky

LongIsland.com

Cassandra Nyati, a Suffolk County Community College from Brentwood and a liberal arts, science and biology major, has been invited to the National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR) in Lexington, Kentucky where she will present ...

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Long Island, NY - March 13, 2014 - Cassandra Nyati, a Suffolk County Community College from Brentwood and a liberal arts, science and biology major, has been invited to the National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR) in Lexington, Kentucky  where she will present her research abstract to students faculty and staff from around the world.

Cassandra’s research, "Internalization and Colocalization in Raft-Mediated Endocytosis," was selected for presentation from more than 4,000 submissions to the NCUR 2014 Abstract Review Committee and is the culmination of Cassandra’s summer 2013 research at Stony Brook University.

Cassandra is a National Science Foundation – Scholarships for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (NSF S-STEM) Scholarship recipient as well as a Collegiate Science Technology Entry program scholar and is planning to utilize her research internship opportunities afforded via programs at Suffolk Community College to transfer to Stony Brook University.

Dr. Candice J. Foley, Principal Investigator and Chair of Suffolk County Community College’s National Science Foundation STEM scholarship grant programs (NSF S-STEM), shared that Suffolk County Community College is a nationally recognized leader in providing quality STEM education as well as research and transfer opportunities for its’ STEM scholars.

“Cassandra’s stellar achievements speak powerfully to the benefits of inter-programmatic collaborations as well as Suffolk County Community College’s outstanding faculty and academic programs which when combined with our close regional educational and federal laboratory opportunities have a demonstrable and transformative impact upon our students' lives and careers.”

“Since joining CSTEP, Cassie has been involved in all aspects of the program, including representing Suffolk at the CSTEP Student Statewide Conference in 2013. Ms. Nyati epitomizes our CSTEP scholars – a very ambitious, articulate, emerging scientist who is involved in the SCCC community,” said Nina Leonhardt  

So, just what was Cassie’s research about? Dr. Deborah Brown, Cassie’s project mentor at Stony Brook University explains.

A thin plasma membrane surrounds each cell in our bodies, providing an interface with other cells and the bloodstream.  The plasma membrane contains embedded proteins that maintain cell communication at the correct level by continually adjust the amount of these proteins in the membrane. Certain cell-surface proteins send signals that cause cells to divide.  This process is essential for life, but must be tightly regulated, because uncontrolled cell division can lead to cancer.   Maintaining the proper level of these proteins on the cell surface is a crucial function of endocytosis.  Unfortunately, endocytosis has been hijacked by disease-causing pathogens. These include viruses, bacteria, and bacterial toxins - proteins powerful enough to kill cells that receive even a few molecules of them.  All these agents use endocytosis to gain entry into our cells.  To be able to control both the good and bad effects of endocytosis, then, we need to understand exactly how it works.

Cassie’s project was to search for ways of changing the amount of lipids in the membrane to test a hypothesis that lipids affect the rate of endocytosis.  It turned out to be a difficult problem.  Cassie got in on the ground floor and after her summer REU internship, the lab built on her work and developed better tools. They now have good evidence to support their model, and are working to manipulate the rate of endocytosis.

“Cassie’s project provided the important first step toward our goal,” Dr. Brown said.

More information about Suffolk County Community College’s NSF S STEM scholarship program may be found at www.sunysuffolk.edu/stem.