Weather Alert  

"Hurricane Statement" This product covers southeast New York, northeast New Jersey, and southern Connecticut **tropical storm watches remain in effect for eastern Long Island and southeast connecticut** New information --------------- * changes to watches and warnings: - none * current watches and warnings: - a tropical storm watch is in effect for northeastern Suffolk, northern Middlesex, northern New London, northwestern Suffolk, southeastern Suffolk, southern Middlesex, southern New Haven, southern New London, and southwestern Suffolk * storm information: - about 360 miles south-southeast of New York City NY or about 350 miles south of Montauk Point NY - 36.0n 71.3w - storm intensity 75 mph - movement north or 360 degrees at 9 mph Situation overview ------------------ Hurricane Jose will continue to track northward through the western Atlantic waters through mid week, passing to the southeast of the area late tonight into Wednesday as a tropical storm. The system looks to be close enough for potential impacts, including tropical storm force winds, coastal flooding, and locally heavy rainfall. The best chance for tropical storm force winds and heavy rain will be across eastern Long Island and southeast Connecticut. Minor to moderate coastal flooding is also likely along with dangerous surf. Potential impacts ----------------- * shoreline hazards: prepare for dangerous surf of 10 to 15 ft causing widespread dune erosion, and localized dune overwashes along the Atlantic beachfront. * Surge: prepare for locally hazardous surge having possible limited impacts across tidal portions of southeast New York and southern Connecticut. Potential impacts in this area include: - localized inundation with storm surge flooding mainly along immediate shorelines and in low-lying spots, or in areas farther inland near where higher surge waters move ashore. - Sections of near-shore roads and parking lots become overspread with surge water. Driving conditions dangerous in places where surge water covers the Road. * Wind: prepare for hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across southeast New York, northeast New Jersey, and southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over. - A few roads impassable from debris, particularly within urban or heavily wooded places. Hazardous driving conditions on bridges and other elevated roadways. - Scattered or isolated power and communications outages. * Flooding rain: prepare for locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible limited impacts across Long Island and southeastern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - rivers, small streams, creeks and canals may become swollen and could overflow in spots. - Flood waters can enter a few structures, especially in usually vulnerable spots. A few places where rapid ponding of water occurs at underpasses, low-lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Several storm drains and retention ponds become near-full and begin to overflow. Some brief Road and bridge closures. Elsewhere across southeast New York, northeast New Jersey, and southern Connecticut, little to no impact is anticipated. Precautionary/preparedness actions ---------------------------------- If you live in a place that is particularly vulnerable to high wind, such as a Mobile home, a boat, plan to move to safe shelter. Take enough supplies for you and your family for several days. If you live in a place particularly vulnerable to flooding, such as near the ocean, in a low lying or poor drainage area, or near an already swollen river, plan to move to safe shelter on higher ground Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for official storm information. Listen for possible changes to the forecast. * Additional sources of information: - for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov - for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org - for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org Next update ----------- The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather Service in New York NY around noon EDT, or sooner if conditions warrant. 520 am EDT Tue Sep 19 2017 This product covers southeast New York, northeast New Jersey, and southern Connecticut **tropical storm watches remain in effect for eastern Long Island and southeast connecticut** New information --------------- * changes to watches and warnings: - none * current watches and warnings: - a tropical storm watch is in effect for northeastern Suffolk, northern Middlesex, northern New London, northwestern Suffolk, southeastern Suffolk, southern Middlesex, southern New Haven, southern New London, and southwestern Suffolk * storm information: - about 360 miles south-southeast of New York City NY or about 350 miles south of Montauk Point NY - 36.0n 71.3w - storm intensity 75 mph - movement north or 360 degrees at 9 mph Situation overview ------------------ Hurricane Jose will continue to track northward through the western Atlantic waters through mid week, passing to the southeast of the area late tonight into Wednesday as a tropical storm. The system looks to be close enough for potential impacts, including tropical storm force winds, coastal flooding, and locally heavy rainfall. The best chance for tropical storm force winds and heavy rain will be across eastern Long Island and southeast Connecticut. Minor to moderate coastal flooding is also likely along with dangerous surf. Potential impacts ----------------- * shoreline hazards: prepare for dangerous surf of 10 to 15 ft causing widespread dune erosion, and localized dune overwashes along the Atlantic beachfront. * Surge: prepare for locally hazardous surge having possible limited impacts across tidal portions of southeast New York and southern Connecticut. Potential impacts in this area include: - localized inundation with storm surge flooding mainly along immediate shorelines and in low-lying spots, or in areas farther inland near where higher surge waters move ashore. - Sections of near-shore roads and parking lots become overspread with surge water. Driving conditions dangerous in places where surge water covers the Road. * Wind: prepare for hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across southeast New York, northeast New Jersey, and southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over. - A few roads impassable from debris, particularly within urban or heavily wooded places. Hazardous driving conditions on bridges and other elevated roadways. - Scattered or isolated power and communications outages. * Flooding rain: prepare for locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible limited impacts across Long Island and southeastern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - rivers, small streams, creeks and canals may become swollen and could overflow in spots. - Flood waters can enter a few structures, especially in usually vulnerable spots. A few places where rapid ponding of water occurs at underpasses, low-lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Several storm drains and retention ponds become near-full and begin to overflow. Some brief Road and bridge closures. Elsewhere across southeast New York, northeast New Jersey, and southern Connecticut, little to no impact is anticipated. Precautionary/preparedness actions ---------------------------------- If you live in a place that is particularly vulnerable to high wind, such as a Mobile home, a boat, plan to move to safe shelter. Take enough supplies for you and your family for several days. If you live in a place particularly vulnerable to flooding, such as near the ocean, in a low lying or poor drainage area, or near an already swollen river, plan to move to safe shelter on higher ground Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for official storm information. Listen for possible changes to the forecast. * Additional sources of information: - for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov - for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org - for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org Next update ----------- The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather Service in New York NY around noon EDT, or sooner if conditions warrant. 520 am EDT Tue Sep 19 2017 This product covers southeast New York, northeast New Jersey, and southern Connecticut **tropical storm watches remain in effect for eastern Long Island and southeast connecticut** New information --------------- * changes to watches and warnings: - none * current watches and warnings: - a tropical storm watch is in effect for northeastern Suffolk, northern Middlesex, northern New London, northwestern Suffolk, southeastern Suffolk, southern Middlesex, southern New Haven, southern New London, and southwestern Suffolk * storm information: - about 360 miles south-southeast of New York City NY or about 350 miles south of Montauk Point NY - 36.0n 71.3w - storm intensity 75 mph - movement north or 360 degrees at 9 mph Situation overview ------------------ Hurricane Jose will continue to track northward through the western Atlantic waters through mid week, passing to the southeast of the area late tonight into Wednesday as a tropical storm. The system looks to be close enough for potential impacts, including tropical storm force winds, coastal flooding, and locally heavy rainfall. The best chance for tropical storm force winds and heavy rain will be across eastern Long Island and southeast Connecticut. Minor to moderate coastal flooding is also likely along with dangerous surf. Potential impacts ----------------- * shoreline hazards: prepare for dangerous surf of 10 to 15 ft causing widespread dune erosion, and localized dune overwashes along the Atlantic beachfront. * Surge: prepare for locally hazardous surge having possible limited impacts across tidal portions of southeast New York and southern Connecticut. Potential impacts in this area include: - localized inundation with storm surge flooding mainly along immediate shorelines and in low-lying spots, or in areas farther inland near where higher surge waters move ashore. - Sections of near-shore roads and parking lots become overspread with surge water. Driving conditions dangerous in places where surge water covers the Road. * Wind: prepare for hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across southeast New York, northeast New Jersey, and southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over. - A few roads impassable from debris, particularly within urban or heavily wooded places. Hazardous driving conditions on bridges and other elevated roadways. - Scattered or isolated power and communications outages. * Flooding rain: prepare for locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible limited impacts across Long Island and southeastern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - rivers, small streams, creeks and canals may become swollen and could overflow in spots. - Flood waters can enter a few structures, especially in usually vulnerable spots. A few places where rapid ponding of water occurs at underpasses, low-lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Several storm drains and retention ponds become near-full and begin to overflow. Some brief Road and bridge closures. Elsewhere across southeast New York, northeast New Jersey, and southern Connecticut, little to no impact is anticipated. Precautionary/preparedness actions ---------------------------------- If you live in a place that is particularly vulnerable to high wind, such as a Mobile home, a boat, plan to move to safe shelter. Take enough supplies for you and your family for several days. If you live in a place particularly vulnerable to flooding, such as near the ocean, in a low lying or poor drainage area, or near an already swollen river, plan to move to safe shelter on higher ground Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for official storm information. Listen for possible changes to the forecast. * Additional sources of information: - for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov - for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org - for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org Next update ----------- The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather Service in New York NY around noon EDT, or sooner if conditions warrant. 520 am EDT Tue Sep 19 2017 This product covers southeast New York, northeast New Jersey, and southern Connecticut **tropical storm watches remain in effect for eastern Long Island and southeast connecticut** New information --------------- * changes to watches and warnings: - none * current watches and warnings: - a tropical storm watch is in effect for northeastern Suffolk, northern Middlesex, northern New London, northwestern Suffolk, southeastern Suffolk, southern Middlesex, southern New Haven, southern New London, and southwestern Suffolk * storm information: - about 360 miles south-southeast of New York City NY or about 350 miles south of Montauk Point NY - 36.0n 71.3w - storm intensity 75 mph - movement north or 360 degrees at 9 mph Situation overview ------------------ Hurricane Jose will continue to track northward through the western Atlantic waters through mid week, passing to the southeast of the area late tonight into Wednesday as a tropical storm. The system looks to be close enough for potential impacts, including tropical storm force winds, coastal flooding, and locally heavy rainfall. The best chance for tropical storm force winds and heavy rain will be across eastern Long Island and southeast Connecticut. Minor to moderate coastal flooding is also likely along with dangerous surf. Potential impacts ----------------- * shoreline hazards: prepare for dangerous surf of 10 to 15 ft causing widespread dune erosion, and localized dune overwashes along the Atlantic beachfront. * Surge: prepare for locally hazardous surge having possible limited impacts across tidal portions of southeast New York and southern Connecticut. Potential impacts in this area include: - localized inundation with storm surge flooding mainly along immediate shorelines and in low-lying spots, or in areas farther inland near where higher surge waters move ashore. - Sections of near-shore roads and parking lots become overspread with surge water. Driving conditions dangerous in places where surge water covers the Road. * Wind: prepare for hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across southeast New York, northeast New Jersey, and southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over. - A few roads impassable from debris, particularly within urban or heavily wooded places. Hazardous driving conditions on bridges and other elevated roadways. - Scattered or isolated power and communications outages. * Flooding rain: prepare for locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible limited impacts across Long Island and southeastern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - rivers, small streams, creeks and canals may become swollen and could overflow in spots. - Flood waters can enter a few structures, especially in usually vulnerable spots. A few places where rapid ponding of water occurs at underpasses, low-lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Several storm drains and retention ponds become near-full and begin to overflow. Some brief Road and bridge closures. Elsewhere across southeast New York, northeast New Jersey, and southern Connecticut, little to no impact is anticipated. Precautionary/preparedness actions ---------------------------------- If you live in a place that is particularly vulnerable to high wind, such as a Mobile home, a boat, plan to move to safe shelter. Take enough supplies for you and your family for several days. If you live in a place particularly vulnerable to flooding, such as near the ocean, in a low lying or poor drainage area, or near an already swollen river, plan to move to safe shelter on higher ground Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for official storm information. Listen for possible changes to the forecast. * Additional sources of information: - for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov - for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org - for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org Next update ----------- The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather Service in New York NY around noon EDT, or sooner if conditions warrant. , "Tropical Storm Watch" 1058 am EDT Tue Sep 19 2017 755 am EDT Tue Sep 19 2017 755 am EDT Tue Sep 19 2017 755 am EDT Tue Sep 19 2017 Attn...WFO...box...okx... 459 am EDT Tue Sep 19 2017 459 am EDT Tue Sep 19 2017 -- Tuesday Sep.19 17,11:12 AM

The Truth Behind St. Patrick’s Day Folklore, Traditions, and Symbolism

Why do we put up pictures of three-leaved clovers, or small red-haired men in celebration of Saint Patrick's Day? Find out why in this guide to the folklore, traditions, and symbolism of Saint Paddy's Day.

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Every March, stores, schools, and offices become full of the typical signs of Saint Patrick’s Day – Irish flags, green shamrocks, and posters of mischievous red-haired leprechauns, but how did these become the universal signs of Saint Paddy’s Day?  Many of the symbols and traditions that we celebrate today come from Irish folklore, and whether they are true or not, many stories are passed on that are just plain myths.  The St. Patrick’s Day we know today is a way for Irish Americans to celebrate their roots.  Sound smart at your Saint Patrick’s Day party, and read up on some of the truth behind the snakes, shamrocks, and more:

Saint Patrick Drove the Snakes out of Ireland
Though the traditionally accepted story goes that Saint Patrick, the Patron Saint of Ireland, drove the snakes out of the country, anyone who goes to Ireland can tell you that the cool, damp climate of the country is not suitable for snakes in the first place.  Snakes never existed on Ireland, and even the idea of St. Patrick being Irish is just a bunch of blarney.  According to historians, Saint Patrick was born in Britain (likely Wales) in the late 300s to an aristocratic family who lived a comfy life in a villa in the country, and owned plenty of slaves.  When he as 16, he was kidnapped and was forced into slavery as a sheepherder on the coast of Ireland.  He tended sheep for several years before, as folklore has it, he heard a voice telling him to escape.  Young Patrick returned to his family in Britain, but then the voices came back, and told him to go back to Ireland and spread the word of Christianity.  Patrick returned to the country where he was once enslaved, and he became a Christian priest, and later a bishop.  He took it as his mission to convert as many Irish people (many of whom were Pagan at the time) to Christianity, and he is believed to have baptized thousands of people in Ireland.  Many historians believe that the snake myth surrounding Saint Patrick grew from the symbol of the snake, which typically represents evil (such as the snake in the Garden of Eden), and that it is a metaphor for Saint Patrick ridding Ireland of the perceived “evil force” of Paganism by introducing Christianity.

Shamrocks
The symbol of the shamrock or three-leaf clover stems from another myth surrounding Saint Patrick, which was that he taught the Irish about Christianity by using a clover, showing that its three leaves represented the Holy Trinity – the father, the son, and the holy spirit.  There is no evidence of this actually happening, but historians believe that many Irish Christians already saw the clover as a symbol of the cross, and it is possible that Saint Patrick adopted this symbol to further his missionary efforts in the country.  Shamrocks are also considered to be a sacred plant in ancient Ireland because they symbolize the rebirth of spring.

A four-leaf clover, on the other hand, is caused by a genetic mutation in three-leaf clovers, and are far less common, which is why finding one supposedly makes the finder lucky, and gives them good luck, according to superstition.  It has been estimated that there are as many as 10,000 three-leaf clovers for every one four-leaf clover.

Leprechauns
Leprechauns are considered to be fairy-like creatures in Irish folklore that date back to Celtic mythology.  They are curmudgeonly and mischievous, and typically take the form of a small man wearing a green outfit and green hat.  According to lore, leprechauns are solitary creatures that live in remote areas as cobblers and make shoes.  They are believed to have a hidden stash of gold, which they obsessively protect. These tiny men have made their way into Saint Patrick’s Day not by any connection to the saint, but because of their ties to Irish culture.

Corned Beef
Though many families make corned beef as the main part of their “Irish” dinner for Saint Paddy’s day, the meal is actually more American than Irish.  Experts say that corned beef has only been associated with Saint Patrick’s Day starting around the turn of the century, and that it started when Irish immigrants living in the Lower East Side of New York City began using corned beef for their Saint Patrick’s Day dinner instead of the traditional dish of Irish bacon in order to save money.  This was a tip that the Irish in NYC actually learned from Jewish people in the community.

 

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