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*TROPICAL STORM ISAIAS MOVING NORTHWARD ALONG THE EAST COAST* This product covers Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut ***TROPICAL STORM ISAIAS MOVING NORTHWARD ALONG THE EAST COAST*** NEW INFORMATION --------------- * CHANGES TO WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - A Tropical Storm Watch has been issued for Orange and Putnam - The Tropical Storm Watch has been upgraded to a Tropical Storm Warning for Bronx, Eastern Bergen, Eastern Essex, Eastern Passaic, Eastern Union, Hudson, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Northeastern Suffolk, Northern Nassau, Northern Queens, Northwestern Suffolk, Richmond (Staten Island), Southeastern Suffolk, Southern Fairfield, Southern Middlesex, Southern Nassau, Southern New Haven, Southern New London, Southern Queens, Southern Westchester, Southwestern Suffolk, Western Bergen, Western Essex, and Western Union * CURRENT WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Bronx, Eastern Bergen, Eastern Essex, Eastern Passaic, Eastern Union, Hudson, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Northeastern Suffolk, Northern Nassau, Northern Queens, Northwestern Suffolk, Richmond (Staten Island), Southeastern Suffolk, Southern Fairfield, Southern Middlesex, Southern Nassau, Southern New Haven, Southern New London, Southern Queens, Southern Westchester, Southwestern Suffolk, Western Bergen, Western Essex, and Western Union - A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for Northern Fairfield, Northern Middlesex, Northern New Haven, Northern New London, Northern Westchester, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, and Western Passaic * STORM INFORMATION: - About 830 miles south-southwest of New York City NY or about 900 miles south-southwest of Montauk Point NY - 29.7N 79.9W - Storm Intensity 70 mph - Movement North or 355 degrees at 9 mph SITUATION OVERVIEW ------------------ Tropical Storm Isaias, located off the north Florida coast, will continue to move to the north this morning, turning north-northeast this afternoon along the southeast coast. Isaias will continue moving northeast tonight over Eastern North Carolina. Isaias will slowly weaken as it accelerates northeast on Tuesday, likely moving over our area Tuesday afternoon and evening. There is still some timing and intensity uncertainty with this storm. However, confidence continues to increase with respect to the magnitude of local hazards and impacts. The main threats with this system involve heavy rainfall, strong winds, minor to moderate coastal flooding, along with high surf and dangerous rip currents. Locally heavy rain is expected with a widespread 2 to 4 inches, with localized amounts up to 6 inches possible. The heaviest rain is most likely to occur across New York City, Northeast New Jersey and the Lower Hudson Valley early Tuesday morning through Tuesday evening, and eastern sections Tuesday afternoon into Tuesday night. The strongest winds are likely to occur across Long Island, coastal Connecticut, and the New York City Metro. Dangerous marine conditions are likely across all of the coastal waters Tuesday and Tuesday night. High surf and dangerous rip currents are expected along the ocean beaches Monday through Wednesday. The effects from Tropical Storm Isaias are expected to diminish quickly from southwest to northeast across the area Tuesday night into Wednesday morning. POTENTIAL IMPACTS ----------------- * FLOODING RAIN: Protect against life-threatening rainfall flooding having possible extensive impacts across northeastern New Jersey, New York City, and the Lower Hudson Valley. Potential impacts include: - Major rainfall flooding may prompt many evacuations and rescues. - Rivers and streams may rapidly overflow their banks in multiple places. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches may become dangerous rivers. Flood control systems and barriers may become stressed. - In hilly terrain, destructive runoff may run quickly down valleys, and increase susceptibility to rockslides and mudslides. - Flood waters can enter many structures within multiple communities, some structures becoming uninhabitable or washed away. Many places where flood waters may cover escape routes. Streets and parking lots become rivers of moving water with underpasses submerged. Driving conditions become dangerous. Many road and bridge closures with some weakened or washed out. * WIND: Protect against dangerous wind having possible significant impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - Some damage to roofing and siding materials, along with damage to porches, awnings, carports, and sheds. A few buildings experiencing window, door, and garage door failures. Mobile homes damaged, especially if unanchored. Unsecured lightweight objects become dangerous projectiles. - Several large trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Several fences and roadway signs blown over. - Some roads impassable from large debris, and more within urban or heavily wooded places. A few bridges, causeways, and access routes impassable. - Scattered power and communications outages, but more prevalent in areas with above ground lines. * SURGE: Protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited impacts across shoreline communities. Potential impacts in this area include: - There is potential for widespread minor to locally moderate coastal flooding across the Lower New York Harbor and South Shore Back Bays, with localized minor flooding impacts elsewhere. - Localized inundation with storm surge flooding mainly along immediate shorelines and in low lying spots. - Sections of near shore roads and parking lots become overspread with surge water. Driving conditions dangerous in places where surge water covers the road. - Moderate beach erosion. Heavy surf also breaching dunes, mainly in usually vulnerable locations. Strong and frequent rip currents. - Minor to locally moderate damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers. A few small craft broken away from moorings. * TORNADOES: Protect against a tornado event having possible limited impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - The occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution of emergency plans during tropical events. - A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power and communications disruptions. - Locations could realize roofs peeled off buildings, chimneys toppled, mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned, large tree tops and branches snapped off, shallow rooted trees knocked over, moving vehicles blown off roads, and small boats pulled from moorings.

Clutterers Anonymous: Helping Long Islanders Cope With Too Much “Stuff”

LongIsland.com

Group assists those who feel their lifestyles are becoming compromised by all-too-common daily urges that have run amok.

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Photo by: Chris Boyle

Long Island, NY - January 25, 2019 - We all have our junk drawers or closets filled with knick-knacks, old clothes, collectibles, or what have you; it’s common for many people to develop a bit of a pack-rat nature when they have their own living space.
 
But imagine that junk drawer becoming a junk room…or several junk rooms…or your entire house; before you know it, the things your own end up owning you. And unfortunately, due to the shame and despair some people engulf themselves in when they see their homes becoming overwhelmed with obsessively-obtained belongings, many don’t seek out help to cope; however, help indeed exists.
 
Ken, the Reporting Secretary of the Plainview-Old Bethpage’s year-old chapter of Clutterers Anonymous, said that his group is there for those who feel their lifestyles are becoming compromised by all-too-common daily urges that have run amok.
 
“Clutterers Anonymous was founded in 1989, and is an officially sanctioned twelve-step program…we use a lot of Alcoholics Anonymous’ literature, re-written with their permission,” he said. “Cluttering and hoarding has always been a problem with people…some people start keeping everything that they’ve ever owned, and they can never throw anything away…magazines, newspapers, or clothing, and sometimes they become hoarders. They just don’t want to let anything go.”
 
However, Ken stated that, like anything else in life, clutterers come in degrees. Some, like the infamous Collyer brothers of the 1940’s who had amassed over 130 tons of garbage in their Manhattan brownstone, or some of the subjects of the A&E television series “Horders,” have allowed their collections to overwhelm both their lives and their homes to the point that they’re unable to function; others, however, simply have a little too much “stuff” but can still carry on with their day-to-day lives, albeit with some difficulty, Ken said.
 
“In my opinion, it stems from an emotional experience somewhere,” he said. “When I was a boy, there was five kids, and we lived in a railroad flat…there was only one closet in the house, and the back of every chair became a closet and the every doorknob had shirts and whatnot hanging on it.”
 
The one thing in common to all clutterers, however, is a difficulty in letting go. Many live with shame, unable to invite friends or relatives into their homes due to the perceived mess, and many don’t seek out the help they need to part with the physical goods simply taking up space in their lives; those that have, however, experience a marked improvement going forward and eventually kick the habit…or at least get it under control.
 
Ken’s experience with cluttering may not be as extreme as some people’s stories, but nonetheless, after a tragic occurrence in his life he slowly began to realize that his home environment had began to spiral out of control; clearly, he needed help, he said.
 
“I lost my wife to cancer about 15 years ago, and I saw a gradual change after she passed,” he said. “At first, I would leave books out, or not do the dishes every day…areas like my living room were clean, I always did my laundry, but other areas of my house, the tables would be totally cluttered, things would pile up…I didn’t like how the house was looking, it became a problem when I had people over, and I figured my wife would be mad at me, so I thought I might need some help.”
 
“Mary” has been attending Clutterers Anonymous meetings on-and-off for three years now, and she credits her participation in this unique twelve-step program, built around guiding principles outlining a course of action for recovery, in helping her get a handle on shopping habits that were becoming obsessive and, ultimately, completely running her life in many ways.
 
“Shopping is fun, but at some point you need to stop retail therapy, because your house becomes full…but it’s hard for me to let go of things, even if I’m no longer crazy about them, or they’re no longer functional,” she said. “I think it’s a fear-based thing…I might need it, like it’s protecting me, and if I keep it, I’m preventing some terrible, unknown, future event from occurring.”
 
However, Mary said that said that she had recognized her behavior wasn’t healthy and active sought out Clutterers Anonymous for some much-needed assistance.
 
“I started realizing that it was keeping me from enjoying my life…the piles of clothing and stuff everywhere just wasn’t pretty, and it became a problem as far as having people over to the house,” she said. “I was just taken with how much I identified with what everyone was saying at the meetings…our circumstances were different, but our feelings were things I identified with.”
 
“I’m very grateful that I’ve gotten to the point that I’m sick and tired of being sick and tired,” Mary added. “I’ve begun to accept that I need less stuff, and to have less stuff I need to be more organized. But the goal isn’t just to be more organized…the goal is to just have fun. I want to have more fun out of life.”
 
Clutterers Anonymous meets weekly on Monday evenings at the Plainview-Old Bethpage Public Library, and according to Ken, it provides a safe haven and help that works… if you want to work at it, that is.
 
“It’s spiritual, it’s physical…it’s not religious, but it’s got a lot of aspects to it,” Ken said. “A big part of it is the sharing…everyone here shares their stories and little coping tricks that they’ve learned. It’s complete anonymous, so you can say whatever you want…if you see a member on the street later, you just pass each other by…but you both know, and it helps.”