Weather Alert  

*TROPICAL STORM ISAIAS MOVING NORTHWARD ALONG THE EAST COAST* This product covers Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut ***TROPICAL STORM ISAIAS MOVING NORTHWARD ALONG THE EAST COAST*** NEW INFORMATION --------------- * CHANGES TO WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - A Tropical Storm Watch has been issued for Orange and Putnam - The Tropical Storm Watch has been upgraded to a Tropical Storm Warning for Bronx, Eastern Bergen, Eastern Essex, Eastern Passaic, Eastern Union, Hudson, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Northeastern Suffolk, Northern Nassau, Northern Queens, Northwestern Suffolk, Richmond (Staten Island), Southeastern Suffolk, Southern Fairfield, Southern Middlesex, Southern Nassau, Southern New Haven, Southern New London, Southern Queens, Southern Westchester, Southwestern Suffolk, Western Bergen, Western Essex, and Western Union * CURRENT WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Bronx, Eastern Bergen, Eastern Essex, Eastern Passaic, Eastern Union, Hudson, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Northeastern Suffolk, Northern Nassau, Northern Queens, Northwestern Suffolk, Richmond (Staten Island), Southeastern Suffolk, Southern Fairfield, Southern Middlesex, Southern Nassau, Southern New Haven, Southern New London, Southern Queens, Southern Westchester, Southwestern Suffolk, Western Bergen, Western Essex, and Western Union - A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for Northern Fairfield, Northern Middlesex, Northern New Haven, Northern New London, Northern Westchester, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, and Western Passaic * STORM INFORMATION: - About 830 miles south-southwest of New York City NY or about 900 miles south-southwest of Montauk Point NY - 29.7N 79.9W - Storm Intensity 70 mph - Movement North or 355 degrees at 9 mph SITUATION OVERVIEW ------------------ Tropical Storm Isaias, located off the north Florida coast, will continue to move to the north this morning, turning north-northeast this afternoon along the southeast coast. Isaias will continue moving northeast tonight over Eastern North Carolina. Isaias will slowly weaken as it accelerates northeast on Tuesday, likely moving over our area Tuesday afternoon and evening. There is still some timing and intensity uncertainty with this storm. However, confidence continues to increase with respect to the magnitude of local hazards and impacts. The main threats with this system involve heavy rainfall, strong winds, minor to moderate coastal flooding, along with high surf and dangerous rip currents. Locally heavy rain is expected with a widespread 2 to 4 inches, with localized amounts up to 6 inches possible. The heaviest rain is most likely to occur across New York City, Northeast New Jersey and the Lower Hudson Valley early Tuesday morning through Tuesday evening, and eastern sections Tuesday afternoon into Tuesday night. The strongest winds are likely to occur across Long Island, coastal Connecticut, and the New York City Metro. Dangerous marine conditions are likely across all of the coastal waters Tuesday and Tuesday night. High surf and dangerous rip currents are expected along the ocean beaches Monday through Wednesday. The effects from Tropical Storm Isaias are expected to diminish quickly from southwest to northeast across the area Tuesday night into Wednesday morning. POTENTIAL IMPACTS ----------------- * FLOODING RAIN: Protect against life-threatening rainfall flooding having possible extensive impacts across northeastern New Jersey, New York City, and the Lower Hudson Valley. Potential impacts include: - Major rainfall flooding may prompt many evacuations and rescues. - Rivers and streams may rapidly overflow their banks in multiple places. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches may become dangerous rivers. Flood control systems and barriers may become stressed. - In hilly terrain, destructive runoff may run quickly down valleys, and increase susceptibility to rockslides and mudslides. - Flood waters can enter many structures within multiple communities, some structures becoming uninhabitable or washed away. Many places where flood waters may cover escape routes. Streets and parking lots become rivers of moving water with underpasses submerged. Driving conditions become dangerous. Many road and bridge closures with some weakened or washed out. * WIND: Protect against dangerous wind having possible significant impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - Some damage to roofing and siding materials, along with damage to porches, awnings, carports, and sheds. A few buildings experiencing window, door, and garage door failures. Mobile homes damaged, especially if unanchored. Unsecured lightweight objects become dangerous projectiles. - Several large trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Several fences and roadway signs blown over. - Some roads impassable from large debris, and more within urban or heavily wooded places. A few bridges, causeways, and access routes impassable. - Scattered power and communications outages, but more prevalent in areas with above ground lines. * SURGE: Protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited impacts across shoreline communities. Potential impacts in this area include: - There is potential for widespread minor to locally moderate coastal flooding across the Lower New York Harbor and South Shore Back Bays, with localized minor flooding impacts elsewhere. - Localized inundation with storm surge flooding mainly along immediate shorelines and in low lying spots. - Sections of near shore roads and parking lots become overspread with surge water. Driving conditions dangerous in places where surge water covers the road. - Moderate beach erosion. Heavy surf also breaching dunes, mainly in usually vulnerable locations. Strong and frequent rip currents. - Minor to locally moderate damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers. A few small craft broken away from moorings. * TORNADOES: Protect against a tornado event having possible limited impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - The occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution of emergency plans during tropical events. - A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power and communications disruptions. - Locations could realize roofs peeled off buildings, chimneys toppled, mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned, large tree tops and branches snapped off, shallow rooted trees knocked over, moving vehicles blown off roads, and small boats pulled from moorings.

Legislative Alert: VA Health Care Funding Needs Your Help Now (Updated Late Fri Afternoon)

LongIsland.com

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I've already written about discretionary versus mandatory / assured funding (Veterans Health Care: Call the Funding What You May, Just Do It -

https://experts.longisland.com/veterans/archive_article.php?ExpArtID=2452

). However, right now we are faced with the case of no funding at all!

Below is a sample communication you could decide to send to your Representative and Senators regarding the recent lack of action by our Congress on the current needed VA Health Care funding issue.

While it is always best to use your own words, if you don't have the time yet feel you want to have your voice heard, feel free to use those below.

To contact your Representative go to "Write Your Representative" (

http://www.house.gov/writerep/

), fill in your state and zip code, and follow the instructions.

To contact our Senators, fill out the Web Forms for Senator Clinton (

http://clinton.senate.gov/contact/webform.cfm

) and Senator Schumer (

http://schumer.senate.gov/SchumerWebsite/contact/webform.cfm

).

And if you should send this to someone not in New York, to contact their Senators they should go to "Senators of the 109th Congress" (

http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm

), select their state, and fill in the "Web Form" for both of their Senators.

Please, consider contacting your Representative and Senators on this issue -- you would be doing a needed service for our current service members and our uniform services' veterans.

I thank you!

-------------------------------------------------------------

Dear ...

In a sentence, quit playing kick-the-can with VA Health Care funding!

Before breaking for Mid-Term Elections earlier this month, Congress passed only two FY 2007 appropriation bills to cover the ongoing cost of the Global War On Terrorism.

Unfortunately, you seem to have forgotten that VA Health Care is also an ongoing cost of war, one that lasts long after the guns are silenced, treaties are signed, and the dead are buried.

I read that there is much talk in Washington about plans to delay final passage of VA Health Care funding until the new 110th Congress is convened. This would mean the VA would continue to be funded at the current funding level, some $8.8 billion less than planned for FY 2007.

Before you adjourn the 109th Congress, there is still important business to be finished. The current continuing resolutions fail to provide adequate funding for VA Health Care. VA medical facilities are continuing to receive new patients returning from Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom. War does not provide "recesses" or "timeouts" for casualties. The "thanks of a grateful nation" is not conditional; it must be a national commitment.

Please, do the right thing -- and do it before you and your fellow Congress members go home to celebrate the holidays with your families and friends; something far too many service members and veterans will not be able to do.

Very truly yours,

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Update 061201.1705-5

Squabble Over Funding South Carolina Facility Could Stall VA Budget Bill
- House and Senate don't agree on funding a joint civilian-VA hospital at University of South Carolina.

Taken From Larry Scott's VA Watchdog dot Org

http://www.vawatchdog.org/nfDEC06/nf120106-9.htm

It looks like the VA budget could be held up because of House/Senate fighting over funding for a joint civilian-VA hospital in South Carolina. This project has been pushed by Rep. Steve Buyer (R-IN), outgoing Chairman of the House Committee on Veterans' Affairs. Buyer's plans to privatize the VA hinge on this joint facility. Background here...

http://www.vawatchdog.org/old newsflashes SEP 06/newsflash09-17-2006-6.htm

Currently, there is $70 million tucked into the VA budget to study this joint venture. The House won't budge on taking it out...and the Senate won't pass it as it stands.

In a most unusual move, Sen. Larry Craig (R-ID), outgoing Chairman of the Senate Committee on Veterans' Affairs, was joined by Ranking Democratic Member and soon-to-be Chair, Sen. Daniel Akaka (D-HI), to issue a "let's hold hands" press release.

In the release, Craig and Akaka state: "


The Senators are concerned that committing to the South Carolina project as passed by the House - without any discussion or compromise - could set a precedent of the federal government spending its limited construction funds for projects other than those directly serving veterans.


"

Hats off to Larry Craig and Daniel Akaka for setting the record straight.

We would be spending hundreds of millions of dollars for a hospital that served civilians and veterans. VA funding is for veterans only! Period!

And, if this budget doesn't pass...we have to look at the big picture. Who caused this? Rep. Steve Buyer.

If veterans have to wait until next year for a budget that should have been ready by October 1, 2006 ... BLAME BUYER !

Press release here...

http://www.vawatchdog.org/senatecvanews/senatecvanews11-30-06.htm

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--- Regards, Walt Schmidt