Weather Alert  

TROPICAL STORM WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT * LOCATIONS AFFECTED - Huntington - Smithtown - Port Jefferson * WIND - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: Equivalent Tropical Storm force wind - Peak Wind Forecast: 40-50 mph with gusts to 70 mph - Window for Tropical Storm force winds: Tuesday afternoon until Tuesday evening - THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY THAT INCLUDES TYPICAL FORECAST UNCERTAINTY IN TRACK, SIZE AND INTENSITY: Potential for wind 58 to 73 mph - The wind threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - PLAN: Plan for dangerous wind of equivalent strong tropical storm force. - PREPARE: Remaining efforts to protect life and property should be completed as soon as possible. Prepare for significant wind damage. - ACT: Move to safe shelter before the wind becomes hazardous. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Significant - Some damage to roofing and siding materials, along with damage to porches, awnings, carports, and sheds. A few buildings experiencing window, door, and garage door failures. Mobile homes damaged, especially if unanchored. Unsecured lightweight objects become dangerous projectiles. - Several large trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Several fences and roadway signs blown over. - Some roads impassable from large debris, and more within urban or heavily wooded places. A few bridges, causeways, and access routes impassable. - Scattered power and communications outages, but more prevalent in areas with above ground lines. * STORM SURGE - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: Localized storm surge possible - Peak Storm Surge Inundation: The potential for 1-3 feet above ground somewhere within surge prone areas - Window of concern: Tuesday afternoon until early Wednesday morning - THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY THAT INCLUDES TYPICAL FORECAST UNCERTAINTY IN TRACK, SIZE AND INTENSITY: Potential for storm surge flooding greater than 1 foot above ground - The storm surge threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - PLAN: Plan for storm surge flooding greater than 1 foot above ground. - PREPARE: Complete preparations for storm surge flooding, especially in low-lying vulnerable areas, before conditions become unsafe. - ACT: Leave immediately if evacuation orders are given for your area. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Limited - Localized inundation with storm surge flooding mainly along immediate shorelines and in low lying spots, or in areas farther inland near where higher surge waters move ashore. - Sections of near shore roads and parking lots become overspread with surge water. Driving conditions dangerous in places where surge water covers the road. - Moderate beach erosion. Heavy surf also breaching dunes, mainly in usually vulnerable locations. Strong and frequent rip currents. - Minor to locally moderate damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers. A few small craft broken away from moorings. * FLOODING RAIN - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: - Peak Rainfall Amounts: Additional 1-3 inches, with locally higher amounts - THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY THAT INCLUDES TYPICAL FORECAST UNCERTAINTY IN TRACK, SIZE AND INTENSITY: Potential for moderate flooding rain - The flooding rain threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - PLAN: Emergency plans should include the potential for moderate flooding from heavy rain. Evacuations and rescues are possible. - PREPARE: Consider protective actions if you are in an area vulnerable to flooding. - ACT: Heed any flood watches and warnings. Failure to take action may result in serious injury or loss of life. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Significant - Moderate rainfall flooding may prompt several evacuations and rescues. - Rivers and streams may quickly become swollen with swifter currents and may overspill their banks in a few places, especially in usually vulnerable spots. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches may overflow. - Flood waters can enter some structures or weaken foundations. Several places may experience expanded areas of rapid inundation at underpasses, low lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Some streets and parking lots take on moving water as storm drains and retention ponds overflow. Driving conditions become hazardous. Some road and bridge closures. * TORNADO - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: - Situation is somewhat favorable for tornadoes - THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY THAT INCLUDES TYPICAL FORECAST UNCERTAINTY IN TRACK, SIZE AND INTENSITY: Potential for a few tornadoes - The tornado threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - PLAN: Emergency plans should include the potential for a few tornadoes. - PREPARE: If your shelter is particularly vulnerable to tornadoes, prepare to relocate to safe shelter before hazardous weather arrives. - ACT: If a tornado warning is issued, be ready to shelter quickly. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Limited - The occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution of emergency plans during tropical events. - A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power and communications disruptions. - Locations could realize roofs peeled off buildings, chimneys toppled, mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned, large tree tops and branches snapped off, shallow rooted trees knocked over, moving vehicles blown off roads, and small boats pulled from moorings. * FOR MORE INFORMATION: - http://scoem.suffolkcountyny.gov - https://weather.gov/nyc - https://ready.gov/hurricanes

Struggling to Cope With Sandy's Aftermath? You are not alone.

LongIsland.com

“Disaster Distress” is very real and can include symptoms such as overwhelming anxiety, trouble sleeping, and other depression like symptoms.

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Surviving a massive storm and its aftermath can certainly take its toll on even the strongest of us.  Whether you and your family were victims of Sandy, or are a first responder, rescue or recovery worker, “Disaster Distress” is very real and can include symptoms such as overwhelming anxiety, trouble sleeping, and other depression like symptoms.

These symptoms can vary greatly from person to person. As per SAMHSA, (Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration) the signs of emotional distress related to tropical storms or hurricanes may include the following:
 

  • Eating or sleeping too much or too little
  • Pulling away from people and things
  • Having low or no energy
  • Feeling numb or like nothing matters
  • Having unexplained aches and pains like constant stomachaches or headaches
  • Feeling helpless or hopeless
  • Excessive smoking, drinking or using drugs (including prescription medication)
  • Feeling unusually confused or forgetful
  • Worrying a lot of the time; feeling guilty but not sure why
  • Feeling like you have to keep busy
  • Hyper-vigilant- constantly thinking that something is going to happen, including when forecasts for any storm are issued whether or not they have the chance to develop into tropical storms or hurricanes
  • Constant yelling or fighting with family and friends; irritable
  • Having thoughts and memories related to the storm that you can't seem to get out of your head; nightmares
  • 'Triggers' such as sounds or images that 'take you back' to the storm; sweating or heart racing when you experience these triggers
  • Unable to perform daily tasks like taking care of your kids or other dependents, trouble showing up to work or school on time or at all (excessive absences), trouble concentrating and getting things done, etc.
  • Thinking of hurting or killing yourself or someone else.


For those who have been through similar traumatic experiences in the past, surviving a disaster can trigger difficult memories or emotions, particularly if the past experience was exceptionally difficult or they experienced post traumatic stress at that time.

For many people, day to day life has been forever changed. Adjusting to the “new normal” can be very unsettling and stress inducing, whether you are temporarily displaced from your home, attending a new or temporary school, lost your place of employment or your job, or are experiencing an overall disruption of your lifestyle and everyday interactions with your neighbors, place of worship, home and community.

Children are especially vulnerable to these feelings and symptoms. They may develop extreme anxiety and fear with regard to weather events and storms, or be too small to understand what is happening around them and to their homes and lives. These emotions may be triggered by news coverage, and television shows showing the storm may cause them to think it is happening all over again, and experience extreme stress and fear about it coming and uprooting their lives all over again. This great video was released to help adults understand how disaster distress may affect children and what you can do to help them.

Preparing in advance is always a good idea. Creating a solid emergency and safety plan for your home and family or business can help you and your loved ones feel calmer, prepared and more in control when a disaster strikes. The American Red Cross, ASPCA, FEMA and the CDC all have resources to help you make your disaster plan and prepare for a future event.

There are many resources available for getting help with disaster distress. Here is a list of tip sheets and contact information to get the help you, your family or your loved ones may need:
American Red Cross:   Coping Tips in the Stressful Aftermath of Sandy  
American Psychological Association: Managing Traumatic Stress: After the Hurricane
http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/hurricane-stress.aspx
American Psychological Association: Dealing With Hurricanes From Afar
http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/hurricane-afar.aspx
National  Child Traumatic Stress Network: Recovery: After a Hurricane
http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/hurricane-afar.aspx
National Child Traumatic Stress Network: Recovery: After a Flood
http://www.nctsn.org/trauma-types/natural-disasters/floods
SAMHSA (Sustance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration):
Tips for Talking With and Helping Children and Youth Cope After a Traumatic Event (.pdf)
Geriatric Mental Health Foundation: Older Adults and Disaster- A Mental Health Care Guide http://www.gmhfonline.org/gmhf/consumer/disaster_prprdns.html

One of the best ways to recover from emotional distress is to focus your energy on helping others deal with the same issues. Whether you can volunteer to lend a hand and help your neighbors or others affected, help out at a local community center or in whatever way you can, you will find that it eases your mind and helps to put your situation in perspective.

It is heartwarming and encouraging to help others, many of whom are in a similar situation as yourself. Creating friendships and talking to others in a similar situation can help ease your symptoms of depression and anxiety, and you may find your anxiety and fears start to fade into the background as you reach out to those around you.


 

 

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