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TROPICAL STORM FAY TO BRING HEAVY RAINFALL, GUSTY WINDS, AND DANGEROUS SURF CONDITIONS This product covers Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut **TROPICAL STORM FAY TO BRING HEAVY RAINFALL, GUSTY WINDS, AND DANGEROUS SURF CONDITIONS** NEW INFORMATION --------------- * CHANGES TO WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - A Tropical Storm Warning has been issued for Bronx, Eastern Essex, Eastern Union, Hudson, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Northeastern Suffolk, Northern Nassau, Northern Queens, Northwestern Suffolk, Richmond (Staten Island), Southeastern Suffolk, Southern Fairfield, Southern Middlesex, Southern Nassau, Southern New Haven, Southern New London, Southern Queens, Southern Westchester, and Southwestern Suffolk * CURRENT WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Bronx, Eastern Essex, Eastern Union, Hudson, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Northeastern Suffolk, Northern Nassau, Northern Queens, Northwestern Suffolk, Richmond (Staten Island), Southeastern Suffolk, Southern Fairfield, Southern Middlesex, Southern Nassau, Southern New Haven, Southern New London, Southern Queens, Southern Westchester, and Southwestern Suffolk * STORM INFORMATION: - About 370 miles south of New York City NY or about 420 miles south-southwest of Montauk Point NY - 35.5N 74.9W - Storm Intensity 45 mph - Movement North or 360 degrees at 7 mph SITUATION OVERVIEW ------------------ Tropical Storm Fay located along North Carolina Outer Banks will move northward along the coast towards the area Friday and will make landfall near the New York City area Friday night. The main threats with this system will be locally heavy rainfall, the potential for flash flooding, and dangerous surf conditions Friday into Friday night. POTENTIAL IMPACTS ----------------- * FLOODING RAIN: Protect against dangerous rainfall flooding having possible significant impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - Moderate rainfall flooding may prompt several evacuations and rescues. - Rivers and streams may quickly become swollen with swifter currents and may overspill their banks in a few places, especially in usually vulnerable spots. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches may overflow. - Flood waters can enter some structures or weaken foundations. Several places may experience expanded areas of rapid inundation at underpasses, low lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Some streets and parking lots take on moving water as storm drains and retention ponds overflow. Driving conditions become hazardous. Some road and bridge closures. * WIND: Protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - Damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored mobile homes. Unsecured lightweight objects blown about. - Many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over. - A few roads impassable from debris, particularly within urban or heavily wooded places. Hazardous driving conditions on bridges and other elevated roadways. - Scattered power and communications outages. * TORNADOES: Protect against a tornado event having possible limited impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - The occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution of emergency plans during tropical events. - A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power and communications disruptions. - Locations could realize roofs peeled off buildings, chimneys toppled, mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned, large tree tops and branches snapped off, shallow rooted trees knocked over, moving vehicles blown off roads, and small boats pulled from moorings. * OTHER COASTAL HAZARDS: Beach flooding and localized dune erosion along the Atlantic Ocean beachfront are possible during the times of high tide Friday through Saturday. Low probability of minor coastal flooding in vulnerable coastal areas during the high tide on Friday night.

Cuomo Reviews LI Senators’ Request to Save Sagamore Children's Psych Center

LongIsland.com

Cuomo announced Friday that he will review the request of nine Long Island senators to keep Sagamore Children's Psychiatric Center open.

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Nine senators from Long Island have come together to push Governor Cuomo to save Sagamore Children’s Psychiatric Center – the only state children’s psychiatric center on Long Island. 

Cuomo announced Friday that he would review the request of Senators Kemp Hannon, David Carlucci, John Flanagan, Philip Boyle, Jack Martins, Dean Skelos, Ken LaValle, Lee Zeldin, Carl Marcellino, and Charles Fuschillo Jr. 

In their request, the senators commended Cuomo for his recent decision to maintain in-patient psychiatric care in St. Lawrence, Binghamton, and Elmira, and asked him to do the same for Sagamore, which provides crucial services for the youth of Long Island.

“It is imperative that you similarly recognize the vitally important role Sagamore Children's Psychiatric Center plays in the lives of children and their families on Long Island," said the senators in their letter. "As the only state inpatient beds for children and adolescents on all of Long Island, the safety net that Sagamore provides must be maintained."

Sagamore Psychiatric Center is located in Dix Hills, and offers inpatient hospitalization for seriously emotionally disturbed children ages 9 to 17 who have conditions such as deep depression, debilitating anxiety, and psychosis.  The center, which is operated by New York State’s Office of Mental Health (OMH), also offers day hospitalization, day treatment, outpatient clinic treatment, outpatient clinical support services, mobile mental health teams, crisis services, information and referral, and community training.

Back in July, the OMH called for the closure of Sagamore’s inpatient hospital, stating that “All inpatient services currently provided by Sagamore Children’s Psychiatric Center will be merged into the Greater New York Children’s RCE to be located in Queens and the Bronx.”  Though the center has been named a Regional Center of Excellence, over the years it has been forced to downsize from 150 beds to 54 beds, and it is currently slated to close in July.

Sagamore offers care to young people who are turned away from community hospitals because they lack insurance coverage, and also cares for children who require more treatment than a short-term hospital stay can provide.

Officials at the Sagamore facility encourage children to feel connected with their families, and so they allow families to visit on weekends and after school on weekdays, as well as take part in therapy sessions.  Children who are in stable condition can earn day and full-weekend passes to visit their family and friends.  Families also participate in monthly “Family Nights,” where they can enjoy social activities with their children and other patients, and they are also invited to holiday parties at the facility.  If Sagamore is closed, the children will be moved to psychiatric facilities in Queens, the Bronx, or farther, which could greatly limit children’s interaction with their families, which would be detrimental to their treatment progress.

“Traveling hours across Long Island into Queens of the Bronx to access care and visit their children who are in crisis would put enormous stress and obstacles in the path of already struggling families,” the senators wrote.

The movement to keep Sagamore’s doors open has taken root across the island with a Change.org petition to stop the shutdown of Sagamore that has garnered over 7,500 signatures. “Save Sagamore” t-shirts and bumpers tickers have also been popping up across Nassau and Suffolk.

To keep the facility open, Cuomo’s decision will have to be reversed by April 1, the beginning of the 2014-2015 fiscal year.

[Source: New York State Senate, Save Sagamore]