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TROPICAL STORM FAY TO BRING HEAVY RAINFALL, STRONG WINDS, AND DANGEROUS SURF CONDITIONS This product covers Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut **TROPICAL STORM FAY TO BRING HEAVY RAINFALL, STRONG WINDS, AND DANGEROUS SURF CONDITIONS** NEW INFORMATION --------------- * CHANGES TO WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - None * CURRENT WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Bronx, Eastern Essex, Eastern Union, Hudson, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Northeastern Suffolk, Northern Nassau, Northern Queens, Northwestern Suffolk, Richmond (Staten Island), Southeastern Suffolk, Southern Fairfield, Southern Middlesex, Southern Nassau, Southern New Haven, Southern New London, Southern Queens, Southern Westchester, and Southwestern Suffolk * STORM INFORMATION: - About 240 miles south of New York City NY or about 300 miles south-southwest of Montauk Point NY - 37.4N 74.8W - Storm Intensity 50 mph - Movement North or 360 degrees at 10 mph SITUATION OVERVIEW ------------------ Tropical Storm Fay, located just east of the southern Delmarva Peninsula, will move northward along the coast towards the area today, making landfall near the New York City area tonight. The main threats with this system will be locally heavy rainfall, the potential for flash flooding, and dangerous surf conditions today into tonight. POTENTIAL IMPACTS ----------------- * FLOODING RAIN: Protect against dangerous rainfall flooding having possible significant impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - Moderate rainfall flooding may prompt several evacuations and rescues. - Rivers and streams may quickly become swollen with swifter currents and may overspill their banks in a few places, especially in usually vulnerable spots. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches may overflow. - Flood waters can enter some structures or weaken foundations. Several places may experience expanded areas of rapid inundation at underpasses, low lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Some streets and parking lots take on moving water as storm drains and retention ponds overflow. Driving conditions become hazardous. Some road and bridge closures. * WIND: Protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - Damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored mobile homes. Unsecured lightweight objects blown about. - Many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over. - A few roads impassable from debris, particularly within urban or heavily wooded places. Hazardous driving conditions on bridges and other elevated roadways. - Scattered power and communications outages. * TORNADOES: Protect against a tornado event having possible limited impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - The occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution of emergency plans during tropical events. - A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power and communications disruptions. - Locations could realize roofs peeled off buildings, chimneys toppled, mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned, large tree tops and branches snapped off, shallow rooted trees knocked over, moving vehicles blown off roads, and small boats pulled from moorings. * OTHER COASTAL HAZARDS: Life-threatening rip currents are likely for all people entering the surf zone. Beach flooding and localized dune erosion along the Atlantic Ocean beachfront are possible during the times of high tide Friday through Saturday. Localized minor flooding, inundation of 1 ft or less, along vulnerable coastal and shoreline locales of the Great South Bay of Long Island and Jamaica Bay, Lower NY/NJ Harbor, Coastal CT, Coastal Westchester, and Gardiners Bay during times of high tide this afternoon into tonight.

Good Dog, Bad Food: Foods for People That Are Bad for Your Dog

LongIsland.com

If you consider the family dog, well, family—and are apt to toss him a piece of your food now and then—proceed with caution.

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Some foods that are meant for people to eat can be dangerous, and even deadly, to your dog.

Photo by: FDA.

Silver Spring, MD - July 27, 2016 - If you consider the family dog, well, family—and are apt to toss him a piece of your food now and then—proceed with caution. Some foods meant for human consumption can be dangerous, and even deadly, to your dog.

How are people and animals different when it comes to food?

According to Carmela Stamper, D.V.M., a veterinarian at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), an animal’s body processes food much differently. “Our bodies may break down foods or other chemicals that a dog’s can’t tolerate,” she says.

And while sometimes people can have severe allergic reactions to foods, it’s different for dogs. “Allergies in animals tend to manifest themselves more in skin or ear issues,” she explains.

Moreover, a food might harm one dog and not another. It depends on a number of factors, including the animal’s genetic makeup and size, as well as the amount that animal eats. “A big lab that eats a bar of dark chocolate may not have any problems,” she says, whereas a Chihuahua could get dangerously ill.

What Foods Top the List?
“In summer, be particularly careful of foods eaten at picnics and barbecues,” Stamper says. Among the foods you want to withhold from your dog are:

  • Raw meat, which can contain E. coli, Salmonella, or other harmful bacteria. If you’re making hamburger patties or setting out steaks and chicken breasts for the barbecue, for instance, make sure they’re well out of reach of your counter-surfing canines; you’re not doing them any favors by tossing a chunk or two. “Food safety is important to you and your pet,” Stamper cautions. Don’t handle raw meat and then give your dog a treat unless you’ve washed your hands first. And remember it works the other way around, too. “People can get sick after handling contaminated dog food, not washing their hands, and then using their hands to eat a sandwich or a slice of pizza,” Stamper says.
  • Grapes, raisins, and currants can cause kidney failure in some dogs. Stamper says not all dogs are affected, but if you think you’re handing your dog a healthy snack, you could be disastrously wrong. But what about other fruits? For instance, can dogs eat apples and bananas? Stamper says yes—just make sure that with apples, you don’t feed your dog the core or seeds.
  • Fried and fatty foods can not only give your dog a stomach ache, but can also cause a potentially life-threatening disease called pancreatitis. Even if your dog is eyeing the fried chicken with longing, resist the temptation to give him his own piece to chew on.
  • Moldy foods are not something you would feed your family, and your dog shouldn’t eat them either. If you put moldy cheese rinds or hamburger buns in the trash can, make sure your dog doesn’t then get into the garbage. By the same token, if you have a compost heap and it’s the first place your dog makes a beeline for, be sure the moldy scraps are well out of reach.
  • Onions, garlic, and chives (as well as onion and garlic powder) can be harmful to your dog, especially in large amounts. If you’ve put a lot of onions and garlic powder in your salsa, marinade, or beans, don’t let your dog get into the leftovers.
  • Salty snacks, in large quantities, could also cause problems in your dog. “Feeding the odd potato chip or pretzel probably won’t do any harm,” Stamper says. But if your dog gets into a whole bag of them, he could get really sick. Make sure your dog has access to plenty of water at all times, especially if he gets into salty snacks.

Two More Ingredients Your Dog Should Avoid
Macadamia nuts can be very harmful to dogs. If you’re packing white chocolate chip macadamia nut cookies, make sure they stay in the picnic basket and out of reach of your dog.

Finally, many dog owners know chocolate is bad for their dogs, but they may not realize that xylitol, a sugar substitute used in many sugarless products, can be deadly for him. Xylitol is found in sugarless gum, candies, oral products, and some peanut butters and other nut butters. “If you feed your dog pills coated in peanut butter, or put peanut butter in their hollow chew toys, make sure to check the list of ingredients first to make sure it doesn’t contain xylitol,” Stamper says.

A Word about Cats
Why the focus on dogs? Stamper says that cats are far pickier eaters than dogs and do not often get into trouble by eating foods that will harm them. She adds, however, that cats are super-sensitive to onions, garlic, and onion and garlic powders, so make sure your cat has no opportunity to eat foods made with these ingredients.

This article appears on FDA’s Consumer Updates page, which features the latest on all FDA-regulated products.