Weather Alert  

TROPICAL STORM WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT * LOCATIONS AFFECTED - Huntington - Smithtown - Port Jefferson * WIND - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: Equivalent Tropical Storm force wind - Peak Wind Forecast: 30-40 mph with gusts to 50 mph - Window for Tropical Storm force winds: early this evening until early Saturday morning - THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY THAT INCLUDES TYPICAL FORECAST UNCERTAINTY IN TRACK, SIZE AND INTENSITY: Potential for wind 39 to 57 mph - The wind threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - PLAN: Plan for hazardous wind of equivalent tropical storm force. - PREPARE: Remaining efforts to protect property should be completed as soon as possible. Prepare for limited wind damage. - ACT: Move to safe shelter before the wind becomes hazardous. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Limited - Damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored mobile homes. Unsecured lightweight objects blown about. - Many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over. - A few roads impassable from debris, particularly within urban or heavily wooded places. Hazardous driving conditions on bridges and other elevated roadways. - Scattered power and communications outages. * STORM SURGE - No storm surge inundation forecast - THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY THAT INCLUDES TYPICAL FORECAST UNCERTAINTY IN TRACK, SIZE AND INTENSITY: Little to no storm surge flooding - The storm surge threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - PLAN: There is little to no threat of storm surge flooding. Rough surf, coastal erosion, and life-threatening rip currents are possible. - PREPARE: Little to no preparations for storm surge flooding are needed. - ACT: Follow the instructions of local officials. Monitor forecasts. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Little to None - Little to no potential impacts from storm surge flooding. * FLOODING RAIN - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: Flash Flood Watch is in effect - Peak Rainfall Amounts: 1-3 inches, with locally higher amounts - THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY THAT INCLUDES TYPICAL FORECAST UNCERTAINTY IN TRACK, SIZE AND INTENSITY: Potential for moderate flooding rain - The flooding rain threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - PLAN: Emergency plans should include the potential for moderate flooding from heavy rain. Evacuations and rescues are possible. - PREPARE: Consider protective actions if you are in an area vulnerable to flooding. - ACT: Heed any flood watches and warnings. Failure to take action may result in serious injury or loss of life. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Significant - Moderate rainfall flooding may prompt several evacuations and rescues. - Rivers and streams may quickly become swollen with swifter currents and may overspill their banks in a few places, especially in usually vulnerable spots. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches may overflow. - Flood waters can enter some structures or weaken foundations. Several places may experience expanded areas of rapid inundation at underpasses, low lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Some streets and parking lots take on moving water as storm drains and retention ponds overflow. Driving conditions become hazardous. Some road and bridge closures. * TORNADO - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: - Situation is somewhat favorable for tornadoes - THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY THAT INCLUDES TYPICAL FORECAST UNCERTAINTY IN TRACK, SIZE AND INTENSITY: Potential for a few tornadoes - The tornado threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - PLAN: Emergency plans should include the potential for a few tornadoes. - PREPARE: If your shelter is particularly vulnerable to tornadoes, prepare to relocate to safe shelter before hazardous weather arrives. - ACT: If a tornado warning is issued, be ready to shelter quickly. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Limited - The occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution of emergency plans during tropical events. - A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power and communications disruptions. - Locations could realize roofs peeled off buildings, chimneys toppled, mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned, large tree tops and branches snapped off, shallow rooted trees knocked over, moving vehicles blown off roads, and small boats pulled from moorings. * FOR MORE INFORMATION: - http://scoem.suffolkcountyny.gov - https://weather.gov/nyc - https://ready.gov/hurricanes

Governor Cuomo Announces $27.5 Million for Youth Summer Jobs Program

LongIsland.com

Funding to Help More Than 18,000 Teens Compete in the Workforce

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Albany, NY - May 19, 2014 - Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced that more than 18,000 young people from low-income households will gain valuable work experience, and a much-needed paycheck, through New York State’s Summer Youth Employment Program. The program connects participants to jobs and helps them acquire skills they can use in school and beyond.

"Helping young New Yorkers find good summer jobs will expand their opportunities and allow them to gain valuable work experience as they prepare for future employment,” Governor Cuomo said. “By building a skilled work force, we are strengthening New York’s economy today, while giving young New Yorkers across the state a chance at a brighter future.”

The New York State Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance (OTDA) is distributing $27.5 million across the state to fund the 2014 Summer Youth Employment Program. Young people in the program will work in places such as school districts, parks, nursing homes, summer camps, child care organizations, senior citizens centers and community recreation centers. 

OTDA Commissioner Kristin M. Proud said, “The Summer Youth Employment Program exposes young people from low-income households to careers in a range of different fields. This experience will help them gain knowledge, skills and confidence as they contemplate their own career paths.”

Businesses currently participating in the Summer Youth Employment Programs as it benefits both the students and employers, adding that some teens are hired in full-time positions after their program is complete.

Executive Director of the Five Towns Community Center in Nassau County Bertha Pruitt said, “Young people really need that opportunity for the summer to make some money for school clothing and some spending money. Sometimes we rehire the kids, even as adults. We know their work and we know their history and have been able to evaluate them.”

Courtney Mrowczynski, Human Resources Coordinator at The Friendly Home in Rochester, which provides care for older adults, said, “We have seen the youths grow and develop valuable work skills such as time management, teamwork and relationship building. We have had youths provide companionship to our residents, participate in recreational activities, and work behind the scenes in areas such as dining services, laundry and grounds keeping. We are pleased to help in their professional development by providing mentoring and real-life work experience. In fact, we have actually hired two of the program youths as part-time Friendly Home employees.”

To be eligible for the program, participants must be between the ages 14 and 20, and their total family income must be below 200 percent of the federal poverty level. For example, the income for a family of three must be below $39,060 a year.

Those who are eligible and interested in participating should contact their local department of social services. To find out how, visit the OTDA website.

Below is a list of 2014 funding amounts by county:

County

2014 Amount

Albany

$440,119

Allegany

$135,119

Broome

$343,325

Cattaraugus

$165,865

Cayuga

$115,588

Chautauqua

$252,489

Chemung

$138,561

Chenango

$90,852

Clinton

$154,608

Columbia

$64,167

Cortland

$118,152

Delaware

$83,276

Dutchess

$314,249

Erie

$1,207,092

Essex

$54,976

Franklin

$92,577

Fulton

$84,390

Genesee

$72,870

Greene

$74,358

Hamilton

$7,005

Herkimer

$95,796

Jefferson

$209,180

Lewis

$48,364

Livingston

$125,146

Madison

$124,447

Monroe

$1,011,857

Montgomery

$72,121

Nassau

$729,842

Niagara

$279,842

New York City

$14,453,761

Oneida

$313,510

Onondaga

$691,262

Ontario

$116,170

Orange

$411,661

Orleans

$61,241

Oswego

$258,106

Otsego

$150,997

Putnam

$45,485

Rensselaer

$207,796

Rockland

$279,648

St. Lawrence

$300,484

Saratoga

$163,189

Schenectady

$164,235

Schoharie

$64,235

Schuyler

$31,712

Seneca

$70,627

Steuben

$158,709

Suffolk

$957,538

Sullivan

$119,218

Tioga

$70,771

Tompkins

$383,428

Ulster

$218,779

Warren

$76,514

Washington

$69,395

Wayne

$112,179

Westchester

$737,924

Wyoming

$61,237

Yates

$43,956