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TROPICAL STORM FAY TO BRING HEAVY RAINFALL, GUSTY WINDS, AND DANGEROUS SURF CONDITIONS This product covers Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut **TROPICAL STORM FAY TO BRING HEAVY RAINFALL, GUSTY WINDS, AND DANGEROUS SURF CONDITIONS** NEW INFORMATION --------------- * CHANGES TO WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - A Tropical Storm Warning has been issued for Bronx, Eastern Essex, Eastern Union, Hudson, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Northeastern Suffolk, Northern Nassau, Northern Queens, Northwestern Suffolk, Richmond (Staten Island), Southeastern Suffolk, Southern Fairfield, Southern Middlesex, Southern Nassau, Southern New Haven, Southern New London, Southern Queens, Southern Westchester, and Southwestern Suffolk * CURRENT WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Bronx, Eastern Essex, Eastern Union, Hudson, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Northeastern Suffolk, Northern Nassau, Northern Queens, Northwestern Suffolk, Richmond (Staten Island), Southeastern Suffolk, Southern Fairfield, Southern Middlesex, Southern Nassau, Southern New Haven, Southern New London, Southern Queens, Southern Westchester, and Southwestern Suffolk * STORM INFORMATION: - About 370 miles south of New York City NY or about 420 miles south-southwest of Montauk Point NY - 35.5N 74.9W - Storm Intensity 45 mph - Movement North or 360 degrees at 7 mph SITUATION OVERVIEW ------------------ Tropical Storm Fay located along North Carolina Outer Banks will move northward along the coast towards the area Friday and will make landfall near the New York City area Friday night. The main threats with this system will be locally heavy rainfall, the potential for flash flooding, and dangerous surf conditions Friday into Friday night. POTENTIAL IMPACTS ----------------- * FLOODING RAIN: Protect against dangerous rainfall flooding having possible significant impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - Moderate rainfall flooding may prompt several evacuations and rescues. - Rivers and streams may quickly become swollen with swifter currents and may overspill their banks in a few places, especially in usually vulnerable spots. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches may overflow. - Flood waters can enter some structures or weaken foundations. Several places may experience expanded areas of rapid inundation at underpasses, low lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Some streets and parking lots take on moving water as storm drains and retention ponds overflow. Driving conditions become hazardous. Some road and bridge closures. * WIND: Protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - Damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored mobile homes. Unsecured lightweight objects blown about. - Many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over. - A few roads impassable from debris, particularly within urban or heavily wooded places. Hazardous driving conditions on bridges and other elevated roadways. - Scattered power and communications outages. * TORNADOES: Protect against a tornado event having possible limited impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - The occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution of emergency plans during tropical events. - A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power and communications disruptions. - Locations could realize roofs peeled off buildings, chimneys toppled, mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned, large tree tops and branches snapped off, shallow rooted trees knocked over, moving vehicles blown off roads, and small boats pulled from moorings. * OTHER COASTAL HAZARDS: Beach flooding and localized dune erosion along the Atlantic Ocean beachfront are possible during the times of high tide Friday through Saturday. Low probability of minor coastal flooding in vulnerable coastal areas during the high tide on Friday night.

Governor Cuomo Announces More Than $453,000 in Grants to Law Enforcement Agencies for New Fingerprinting Technology

LongIsland.com

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced more than $453,000 in state grants to enable 39 police departments and sheriffs' offices to purchase new electronic fingerprinting equipment.

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Glen Cove Police Department, Nassau County Police Department, and Suffolk County Sheriff's Office are among the recipients of the grant.

Photo by: Governor's Press Office.

Albany, NY - May 18, 2016 - Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced more than $453,000 in state grants to enable 39 police departments and sheriffs' offices to purchase new electronic fingerprinting equipment. With this investment, the state has provided nearly $1.2 million to local law enforcement since last fall, enabling a total of 90 agencies across the state to replace existing devices that are old or obsolete.

"Fingerprint analysis is a critical tool in criminal investigations and we must ensure police departments have access to the resources and the most up-to-date technology to conduct it properly," Governor Cuomo said. "These grants will help law enforcement across New York maintain and even upgrade this crucial equipment and strengthen their ability to keep our communities safe."

Municipal police departments and county sheriffs' offices across the state were eligible to apply for up to $10,000 for each device or other related equipment, such as printers, scanners and cameras.

Priority was given to those agencies with the highest number of arrests from 2013 through 2015 and agencies hosting regional servers that allow others to electronically submit fingerprints to the state and Federal Bureau of Investigation could apply for funding for more than one device. The request for applications also required that agencies match state funds because the technology is crucial to both local law enforcement and the state.

Click here to view agencies and municipalities receiving grants.

Division of Criminal Justice Services Executive Deputy Commissioner Michael C. Green said, "Critical to the DCJS mission is our support of local law enforcement agencies. These grants will help ensure that police, prosecutors and the courts continue to receive positive identification and any past criminal history information of arrestees from DCJS within minutes, 24 hours a day, seven days a week."

All fingerprints taken in connection with arrests must be submitted electronically to the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services – the state's repository of criminal history record information – and the FBI. Digital fingerprint technology enables law enforcement agencies and the courts to instantly receive an arrestee's positive identification and any past criminal history and warrant information from the state. This information is crucial in determining how cases against arrested individuals proceed, including whether bail is set by the court.

This is the second time in seven months that the Division of Criminal Justice Services has awarded grants for this technology. Last fall, 51 agencies received a total of $710,000. The Division of Criminal Justice Services expects to make funding for this technology available annually, with the ultimate goal of helping all agencies upgrade to new technology and associated equipment.

The New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services is a multi-function criminal justice support agency with a variety of responsibilities, including law enforcement training; collection and analysis of statewide crime data; maintenance of criminal history information and fingerprint files; administrative oversight of the state's DNA databank, in partnership with the New York State Police; funding and oversight of probation and community correction programs; administration of federal and state criminal justice funds; support of criminal justice-related agencies across the state; and administration of the state’s Sex Offender Registry.