Weather Alert  

Coastal Flood Statement issued December 13 at 5:33PM EST until December 14 at 2:00PM EST by NWS Upton NY * WHAT...Up to one half foot of inundation above ground level expected in vulnerable areas near the waterfront and shoreline. * WHERE...Southwestern Suffolk, Southeastern Suffolk and Northeastern Suffolk Counties. * WHEN...During the times of high tide Saturday morning through Saturday afternoon. * COASTAL FLOOD IMPACTS...Brief minor flooding of the more vulnerable locations near the waterfront and shoreline. * SHORELINE IMPACTS...Breaking surf of 9 to 13 ft along the Atlantic Ocean beachfront will cause significant beach flooding and erosion during the times of high tide Saturday into Saturday Night. Scattered areas of dune erosion and localized washovers are possible during the times of high tide Saturday morning into afternoon.

Governor Cuomo Declares State of Emergency for Mid-Hudson, New York City, and Long Island Regions

LongIsland.com

New Yorkers Urged to Stay off Roads as Nor’Easter Storm Continues to Impact Downstate Regions.

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Albany, NY  - February 13, 2014 - Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today declared a state of emergency for the Mid-Hudson, New York City, and Long Island regions as a Nor’Easter storm continues to impact parts of the State. Under a state of emergency, critical resources that are normally restricted to State use are mobilized to assist local governments and laws and regulations that would otherwise impede their rapid response are suspended.
 
“With this winter storm continuing to deliver snow, ice, and freezing rain across parts of the State, I am declaring a state of emergency in these regions so that we can continue to effectively respond to the storm and aid communities in need,” Governor Cuomo said. “These regions are expected to continue to receive heavy snow that may accumulate at rates of around two to three inches per hour, which will make it difficult for plows to keep some roads clear. New Yorkers should stay off of the roads and remain in their homes until the worst of the storm has passed.”