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TROPICAL STORM ISAIAS MOVING NORTHWARD ALONG THE EASTERN SEABOARD This product covers Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut **TROPICAL STORM ISAIAS MOVING NORTHWARD ALONG THE EASTERN SEABOARD** NEW INFORMATION --------------- * CHANGES TO WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - The Tropical Storm Watch has been upgraded to a Tropical Storm Warning for Northern Fairfield, Northern Middlesex, Northern New Haven, Northern New London, Northern Westchester, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, and Western Passaic * CURRENT WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Bronx, Eastern Bergen, Eastern Essex, Eastern Passaic, Eastern Union, Hudson, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Northeastern Suffolk, Northern Fairfield, Northern Middlesex, Northern Nassau, Northern New Haven, Northern New London, Northern Queens, Northern Westchester, Northwestern Suffolk, Orange, Putnam, Richmond (Staten Island), Rockland, Southeastern Suffolk, Southern Fairfield, Southern Middlesex, Southern Nassau, Southern New Haven, Southern New London, Southern Queens, Southern Westchester, Southwestern Suffolk, Western Bergen, Western Essex, Western Passaic, and Western Union * STORM INFORMATION: - About 770 miles south-southwest of New York City NY or about 850 miles southwest of Montauk Point NY - 30.7N 80.1W - Storm Intensity 70 mph - Movement North or 360 degrees at 13 mph SITUATION OVERVIEW ------------------ Tropical Storm Isaias, located off the north Florida coast, will continue to move to the north this morning, turning north-northeast this afternoon along the southeast coast. Isaias will continue moving northeast tonight over Eastern North Carolina. Isaias will slowly weaken as it accelerates northeast on Tuesday, likely moving over our area Tuesday afternoon and evening. There is still some timing and intensity uncertainty with this storm. However, confidence continues to increase with respect to the magnitude of local hazards and impacts. The main threats with this system involve heavy rainfall, strong winds, minor to moderate coastal flooding, along with high surf and dangerous rip currents. Locally heavy rain is expected with a widespread 2 to 4 inches, with localized amounts up to 6 inches possible. The heaviest rain is most likely to occur across New York City, Northeast New Jersey and the Lower Hudson Valley early Tuesday morning through Tuesday evening, and eastern sections Tuesday afternoon into Tuesday night. The strongest winds are likely to occur across Long Island, southern Westchester and southern Connecticut, and the New York City and New Jersey Metro areas. Dangerous marine conditions are likely across all of the coastal waters Tuesday and Tuesday night. High surf and dangerous rip currents are expected along the ocean beaches Monday through Wednesday. The effects from Tropical Storm Isaias are expected to diminish quickly from southwest to northeast across the area Tuesday night. POTENTIAL IMPACTS ----------------- * FLOODING RAIN: Prepare for life-threatening rainfall flooding having possible extensive impacts across northeast New Jersey, New York City, and the Lower Hudson Valley. Potential impacts include: - Major rainfall flooding may prompt many evacuations and rescues. - Rivers and streams may rapidly overflow their banks in multiple places. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches may become dangerous rivers. Flood control systems and barriers may become stressed. - In hilly terrain, destructive runoff may run quickly down valleys, and increase susceptibility to rockslides and mudslides. - Flood waters can enter many structures within multiple communities, some structures becoming uninhabitable or washed away. Many places where flood waters may cover escape routes. Streets and parking lots become rivers of moving water with underpasses submerged. Driving conditions become dangerous. Many road and bridge closures with some weakened or washed out. * WIND: Prepare for dangerous wind having possible significant impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - Some damage to roofing and siding materials, along with damage to porches, awnings, carports, and sheds. A few buildings experiencing window, door, and garage door failures. Mobile homes damaged, especially if unanchored. Unsecured lightweight objects become dangerous projectiles. - Several large trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Several fences and roadway signs blown over. - Some roads impassable from large debris, and more within urban or heavily wooded places. A few bridges, causeways, and access routes impassable. - Scattered power and communications outages, but more prevalent in areas with above ground lines. * SURGE: Prepare for locally hazardous surge having possible limited impacts across shoreline communities. Potential impacts in this area include: - Localized inundation with storm surge flooding mainly along immediate shorelines and in low lying spots, or in areas farther inland near where higher surge waters move ashore. - Sections of near shore roads and parking lots become overspread with surge water. Driving conditions dangerous in places where surge water covers the road. - Moderate beach erosion. Heavy surf also breaching dunes, mainly in usually vulnerable locations. Strong and frequent rip currents. - Minor to locally moderate damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers. A few small craft broken away from moorings. * TORNADOES: Prepare for a tornado event having possible limited impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - The occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution of emergency plans during tropical events. - A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power and communications disruptions. - Locations could realize roofs peeled off buildings, chimneys toppled, mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned, large tree tops and branches snapped off, shallow rooted trees knocked over, moving vehicles blown off roads, and small boats pulled from moorings.

Schumer, Gillibrand Announce Federal Funds for Suffolk, Long Beach, LIPA For Sandy Cleanup Costs

LongIsland.com

FEMA funding will reimburse millions for removal of hazardous debris.

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Washington, DC - January 7, 2013 - Suffolk County: U.S. Senators Charles E. Schumer and Kirsten E. Gillibrand today announced $2,311.525.73 infederal funds for Suffolk County to cover costs associated with countywide hazardous debris removal in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. This work was undertaken after the storm deposited thousands of cubic yards of sand and other debris across the county.
 
“Suffolk County was hit hard by Hurricane Sandy, and forcing residents to pay expensive cleanup costs would be adding insult to injury,” said Schumer. “These federal funds will go a long way towards ensuring that Suffolk County residents do not have to foot the bill for storm cleanup.”
 
“This federal funding will provide much needed relief for Suffolk County families and businesses impacted by Superstorm Sandy,” said Gillibrand. “It is critical that Long Island communities have the necessary resources on the ground to recover and rebuild.” 
 
Superstorm Sandy brought strong winds and heavy rains to the New York tri-state area, resulting in downed trees, scattered vegetative debris and other materials strewn throughout busy roadways. Debris was deposited onto public rights of ways, streets, and public access areas throughout the County that posed an immediate threat to public safety and therefore, needed to be removed. Approximately 464,154CY of vegetative debris was removed following Superstorm Sandy.
 
This funding is in addition to the $14 million in federal funds that Suffolk County Department of Public Works received in July to cover Hurricane Sandy hazardous debris removal costs.
 
Long Beach: U.S. Senators Charles E. Schumer and Kirsten E. Gillibrand today announced $6,679,908.58infederal funds for the City of Long Beach to cover costs associated with hazardous debris removal in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. This work was undertaken after the storm deposited over 150,000 cubic yards of sand and other debris across Long Beach roads. The funds, which come from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), cover 90% of costs.
 
“Long Beach was extremely hard hit by Hurricane Sandy, and forcing residents to pay expensive cleanup costs would be adding insult to injury,” said Schumer. “These federal funds will go a long way towards ensuring that Long Beach does not have to foot the bill for storm cleanup, and instead can continue to get back up on its feet.”
 
“This federal funding will provide much needed relief for Long Island families and businesses impacted by Superstorm Sandy,” said Gillibrand. “It is critical that Long Beach has the necessary resources on the ground to recover and rebuild.”
 
"Following Superstorm Sandy, this City administration was responsible for managing a monumental sand and debris removal procedure,” said Scott J. Mandel, Long Beach City Council President. “We thank Senators Schumer and Gillibrand for cutting through the bureaucracy and expediting the reimbursement process. The federal funding that we will now receive covers significant costs we incurred and is another important step towards rebuilding stronger, smarter, and safer."
 
Superstorm Sandy brought strong winds and heavy rains to the New York tri-state area, resulting in downed trees, scattered vegetative debris and other materials strewn throughout busy roadways. Debris was deposited onto public rights of ways, streets, and public access areas throughout Long Beach that posed an immediate threat to public safety and therefore, needed to be removed. In total, the City of Long Beach removed 156,664.6 cubic yards of debris generated from Hurricane Sandy, and these FEMA funds will reimburse the city for the cost of cleanup of that debris.
 
In order to clean up the debris in a timely fashion, the City of Long Beach set up Temporary Disposal Staging and Reduction Sites (TDSRS) across the city as collection points for processing. The disaster debris collected at these sites was then eventually hauled to a final disposal site.
 
These federal funds are in addition to the $19,795,669 FEMA awarded the New York State Department of Transportation in July 2013 to reimburse them for the costs of collection, removal, and disposal of debris in Long Beach that resulted from Superstorm Sandy. 
 
LIPA: U.S. Senators Charles E. Schumer and Kirsten E. Gillibrand today announced $141,647,444.80 infederal funds for Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) to be put towards reimbursement of additional line- and tree-removal crews who aided in post-Sandy cleanup and expenses associated with the effort. These crews were hired in the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Sandy to assist LIPA in the massive, Island-wide cleanup and power-restoration operation.
 
 “Long Islanders already went through enough during Hurricane Sandy, and forcing them to pay expensive cleanup costs would be adding insult to injury,” said Schumer. “These federal funds will go a long way towards ensuring that Long Island ratepayers do not find themselves footing the bill for storm damage and cleanup.”
 
"Long Island took some of the very worst of Superstorm Sandy, leaving families and businesses in the dark without power and damaged roads and streets,” said Gillibrand. “It is critical that Long Island has the necessary resources on the ground to recover and rebuild."
 
According to the grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which provides the funds to New York State for it to distribute, LIPA's four divisions sustained damages to 877 overhead circuits and 149 substations during Hurricane Sandy. The extent of these damages required LIPA to bring in off-island line- and tree-removal crews to help with the repair of the damaged utility lines and substations.  These crews were contracted through in-place mutual-aid agreements, municipality mutual agreements, contracts with regional power providers, and contracts with vendors associated with line repair.
 
Roughly half of the federal funds will go towards covering the costs of the additional workers, and the other half will go towards covering expenses associated with the increased manpower such as the construction of staging areas, securing of parking lots, development of temporary housing, as well as hotel and travel costs. For example, LIPA utilized outside contractors to assemble, run, and disassemble 14 self-contained sleep base camps across Long Island, which housed a large percentage of the 10,000 linemen and tree-removal crews that were brought in to assist with cleanup.
 
The strong winds and heavy rain of Superstorm Sandy resulted in close to one million Long Islanders being without power, and these federal funds will help reimburse costs associated with restoring power across Nassau and Suffolk Counties.