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Backyard Gardening Tips

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EleanorBB

Post: 1
Location: ----

Re:Backyard Gardening Tips

23 Mar, 2012 9:16 a.m.

I think a lot of people who have little gardening experience don't realize that different plants need to be planted different stages. Beans have to go in early, cucumbers a little later...but don't put your tomatoes in until nearly June. The same is true for different flowers. Spring bulbs, for instance, should go into the ground early enough (as in, late fall/early winter) to give the roots time to establish before the ground freezes, but not too early so that the flowers sprout. Nows a good time to get the strawberry plants in...plants, not seeds. Might be a little to late for that. Anyway, the over all point here is that if you are planning a diverse vegetable or flower garden, get a good idea of WHEN each plant ought to be planted.

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vickiem

Post: 6
Location: ----

Re:Backyard Gardening Tips

23 Mar, 2012 8:38 p.m.

Thanks, Frank, for your wonderful new book! I am not an experienced gardener by any means, but your work reminded me that, years ago, my husband and I created a large compost pile in our backyard. I remember adding to it, turning it over and using the fruits of my labor to nourish my flower beds and shrubs. I saved kitchen scraps in a can or receptacle on my counter. Almost everything went into the pile—with the exception of meat, bones and milk products, which attract pests and rodents (also fatty wastes do not break down quickly and can impede the composting process).
You can start your pile right on the ground (we dug a shallow trench) with grass clippings and kitchen scraps (be sure to avoid any weeds or diseased plant material), and add to the pile as organic materials are available. We used a shovel or pitchfork to turn the pile at least once a week (you want to be certain that your pile is not too wet and is getting plenty of oxygen).
Over time, your pile will shrink; and when it turns to dark soil that crumbles in your hand, your homemade, nutrient-rich compost is ready to use. Don’t use all of the compost, but be certain to retain some of it as “starter” material for your next pile. Compost nourishes your plants and vegetables with nutrient-rich organic matter—you will see the difference--and it makes your garden look beautiful!
Not only is composting fun and easy, it is very satisfying knowing you are cooperating with the earth, returning to it so that it can return to you—in multiplied measure!!

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amyg

Post: 33
Location: ----

Re:Backyard Gardening Tips

27 Mar, 2012 9:34 a.m.

I would like to thank everyone who participated in our Backyard Gardening Tips Book Giveaway discussion. The winners that have been selected by LongIsland.com to receive a free copy of Frank Salerno's book, From Seed to Salad, A Step-by-Step Manual for Backyard Gardening, are cruzer, kmburgos, EleanorBB, for their advice on keeping pests out of the garden, building a makeshift greenhouse for winter herbs and timing you garden appropriately. Thank you to Frank Salerno for providing the prizes for this discussion, and participating in the conversation. This forum will remain open, so please continue to share you gardening tips, and pick up a copy of Frank's advice-packed book to help you get the ball rolling on your own backyard garden!

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GiGiCope

Post: 1
Location: ----

Re:Backyard Gardening Tips

27 Mar, 2012 9:37 a.m.

I've found that creating a garden box has really helped to keep pests away. I've even put nets over the plants held up by metal posts in order to keep critters from nibbling on the green stuff. And the grid-like top also helps to prevent the plants from getting tangled with each other.



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seedsalad

Post: 2
Location: Oceanside, NY

Re:Backyard Gardening Tips

27 Mar, 2012 2:23 p.m.

I enjoyed reading the tips offered up by some in the gardening community. It's always fun to read what others have to say. The garden is the one place where peace and tranquility transcend all the anger, discouragement and frustration people feel over world and local events. Let us all hope for a successful season, and let's try to keep this forum going.

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amyg

Post: 33
Location: ----

Re:Backyard Gardening Tips

30 Mar, 2012 2:16 p.m.

Central Long Islanders - this one will especially interest you. A discount grocery store in Bay Shore, Aldi, is selling a variety of roses plants with thick sturdy roots for $5. I noticed them just this week, but their stock doesn't always last. It seems like a great deal to me! Enjoy all the flowering trees this week!

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amyg

Post: 33
Location: ----

Re:Backyard Gardening Tips

06 Apr, 2012 1:16 p.m.

So, I am looking to add two indoor hanging plants to my new apartment. I'm looking for something more vine-y and less flower-y, so I don't have to clean up too much! Does anyone have any good suggestions for hearty and easy indoor plants?

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amyg

Post: 33
Location: ----

Re:Backyard Gardening Tips

09 Apr, 2012 12:07 p.m.

So, this weekend I made trimmings from the potted basil plants that we made at the end of last summer as an experiment to see if we could keep the same plant going for another year, and possibly save a few bucks not having to buy new seeds or seedlings. The plants survived, not in the best of health, in a window facing north - so not much sun getting to them. Anyway, with basil plants, the best thing is the trim from the top, so the plant grows out, and not up, giving it some bulk. I'm going to take the trimmings I just made and put them in a vase of water until small roots form, and then re-pot them in something larger. Last summer we had two very successful, and large, basil plants that grew very well in a large pot, in case some of you are anxious about growing fresh herbs and veggies out of a traditional garden. I've also got strawberry seeds waiting to germinate - hopefully by this time next year I'll have something ground-worthy. Happy gardening!

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amyg

Post: 33
Location: ----

Re:Backyard Gardening Tips

16 Apr, 2012 7:33 a.m.

Yesterday I put some sunflower seeds down in one of my grandmother's flower beds. This patch of dirt is up against their garage, and I suppose it hasn't been watered anytime lately with the lack of precipitation. The dirt was completely dry - I was kicking up dust all over the place. I used two 2-gallon watering cans, mixed in some potting soil and used another can of water on it, but the dirt just floated to the top of the water. This is gearing up to be a very dry season, front lawns are burning up in April....so if you plan on having any successful gardens this year - flower, vegetable, even a lawn, - I suggest you get the sprinkler going, at least every few days for a few hours.

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Cruzer

Post: 49
Location: ----

Re:Backyard Gardening Tips

16 Apr, 2012 10:51 p.m.

That's a really clever idea. I'm not much of a gardener, but I do love to cook so I might have to give this a shot.
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