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ISAIAS MOVING OVER SOUTHEAST NORTH CAROLINA This product covers Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut **ISAIAS MOVING OVER SOUTHEAST NORTH CAROLINA** NEW INFORMATION --------------- * CHANGES TO WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - None * CURRENT WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Bronx, Eastern Bergen, Eastern Essex, Eastern Passaic, Eastern Union, Hudson, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Northeastern Suffolk, Northern Fairfield, Northern Middlesex, Northern Nassau, Northern New Haven, Northern New London, Northern Queens, Northern Westchester, Northwestern Suffolk, Orange, Putnam, Richmond (Staten Island), Rockland, Southeastern Suffolk, Southern Fairfield, Southern Middlesex, Southern Nassau, Southern New Haven, Southern New London, Southern Queens, Southern Westchester, Southwestern Suffolk, Western Bergen, Western Essex, Western Passaic, and Western Union * STORM INFORMATION: - About 540 miles south-southwest of New York City NY or about 620 miles southwest of Montauk Point NY - 33.8N 78.5W - Storm Intensity 85 mph - Movement North-northeast or 20 degrees at 22 mph SITUATION OVERVIEW ------------------ Hurricane Isaias, located off the coast of North Carolina, will continue to move to north-northeast tonight along the coast. Isaias will slowly weaken as it accelerates northeast on Tuesday, likely moving over our area Tuesday afternoon and evening. However, confidence continues to increase with respect to the magnitude of local hazards and impacts. The main threats with this system involve heavy rainfall, strong winds, minor to moderate coastal flooding, along with high surf and dangerous rip currents. Additionally, a few tornadoes are possible. Locally heavy rainfall is expected with a widespread 2 to 4 inches, with localized amounts up to 6 inches possible. The heaviest rain is most likely to occur across New York City, Northeast New Jersey and the Lower Hudson Valley early Tuesday morning through Tuesday evening, and eastern sections Tuesday afternoon into Tuesday night. The strongest winds are likely to occur across New York City Metro, Long Island, northeast New Jersey, southern portions of the Lower Hudson Valley, and southeast Connecticut. Dangerous marine conditions are likely across all of the coastal waters Tuesday and Tuesday night. High surf and dangerous rip currents are expected along the ocean beaches Monday through Wednesday. The effects from Tropical Storm Isaias are expected to diminish quickly from southwest to northeast across the area Tuesday night into Wednesday morning. POTENTIAL IMPACTS ----------------- * FLOODING RAIN: Protect against life-threatening rainfall flooding having possible extensive impacts across New Jersey, New York City, the Lower Hudson Valley, and portions of southeastern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - Major rainfall flooding may prompt many evacuations and rescues. - Rivers and streams may rapidly overflow their banks in multiple places. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches may become dangerous rivers. Flood control systems and barriers may become stressed. - In hilly terrain, destructive runoff may run quickly down valleys, and increase susceptibility to rockslides and mudslides. - Flood waters can enter many structures within multiple communities, some structures becoming uninhabitable or washed away. Many places where flood waters may cover escape routes. Streets and parking lots become rivers of moving water with underpasses submerged. Driving conditions become dangerous. Many road and bridge closures with some weakened or washed out. * WIND: Protect against dangerous wind having possible significant impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts in this area include: - Some damage to roofing and siding materials, along with damage to porches, awnings, carports, and sheds. A few buildings experiencing window, door, and garage door failures. Mobile homes damaged, especially if unanchored. Unsecured lightweight objects become dangerous projectiles. - Several large trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Several fences and roadway signs blown over. - Some roads impassable from large debris, and more within urban or heavily wooded places. A few bridges, causeways, and access routes impassable. - Scattered power and communications outages, but more prevalent in areas with above ground lines. * SURGE: Protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited impacts across shoreline communities. Potential impacts in this area include: - Localized inundation with storm surge flooding mainly along immediate shorelines and in low lying spots, or in areas farther inland near where higher surge waters move ashore. - Sections of near shore roads and parking lots become overspread with surge water. Driving conditions dangerous in places where surge water covers the road. - Moderate beach erosion. Heavy surf also breaching dunes, mainly in usually vulnerable locations. Strong and frequent rip currents. - Minor to locally moderate damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers. A few small craft broken away from moorings. Elsewhere across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut, little to no impact is anticipated. * TORNADOES: Protect against a tornado event having possible limited impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - The occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution of emergency plans during tropical events. - A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power and communications disruptions. - Locations could realize roofs peeled off buildings, chimneys toppled, mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned, large tree tops and branches snapped off, shallow rooted trees knocked over, moving vehicles blown off roads, and small boats pulled from moorings.

MEDIA ADVISORY For January 21, 2011: Gershow Recycling Supports Can Tabs for Kids

LongIsland.com

Supporting the fight against childhood cancer

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: Jonathan Abrams, Manager, Gershow Recycling
Keith Fasciana, principal, William Floyd Elementary School
Maria Marks and Zachary Shiekh, students, William Floyd Elementary School
Dr. Robert Parker, associate director, Stony Brook University Cancer Center
Debra Giugliano, Director of the School Re-Entry Program, Stony Brook University Medical Center

What: Gershow Recycling is supporting Can Tabs for Kids, a fundraising project to help in the fight against childhood cancer. All proceeds will benefit the Sunrise Fund at Stony Brook University, an organization that raises funds and awareness about childhood cancer. An assembly will be held to announce the start of the program and Gershow will make a donation to help kick it off. Can tab collection bins will be placed in all elementary schools in the William Floyd School District.

Students will collect aluminum tabs from soda and pet food cans and place them in collection bins located in their classrooms. The tabs will be brought to Gershow, where they will be weighed and recycled. Gershow will pay for the tabs and submit a matching donation to benefit the Sunrise Fund. (Example: $50 worth of tabs will equal $100 for the Sunrise Fund.)

The program was inspired by Maria Marks, a William Floyd Elementary School student who was diagnosed with cancer at a young age. Between the ages of two weeks and six months, she underwent numerous chemotherapy sessions. The constant exposure to the radiation resulted in Maria losing her hearing in both ears and now she must wear hearing aids. Her cancer has since been in remission.

When she was in the third grade, she noticed the school announcing fundraisers for diabetes awareness and for the victims of the earthquake in Haiti, but there were no fundraisers for childhood cancer awareness. She brought that to the attention of school officials and her parents, Peter and Nancy Marks, who had recently become involved with the Sunrise Fund.

When: Friday, January 21, 2011
12:30 p.m.

Where: William Floyd Elementary School
111 Lexington Road
Shirley, NY

Directions: LIE to Exit 68 (William Floyd Parkway/CR 46) toward Shirley. Go 4.7 miles. Turn left at Lawrence Road, then turn left again on Lexington Road North. School is on the right-hand side.

Photo Ops: Mr. Abrams joined by Mr. Fasciana, Maria Marks and Dr. Parker with the tabs collected so far. Mr. Abrams speaking to the students. Mr. Abrams presenting the check to Mr. Fasciana, Maria, Zachary, Ms. Giugliano and Dr. Parker.

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Started in 1964 by Sam Gershowitz, Gershow Recycling began as a two man operation with a tractor and trailer, a boom truck and the first portable car flattener. Now with the second generation carrying on the legacy, Gershow generates over 750 jobs, contributing millions of dollars to local economy, while helping to preserve Long Island's environment. Gershow Recycling takes aluminum, brass, copper, steel, cast iron, appliances, cars and vehicles. In keeping with its philosophy of "Preserving the Future by Recycling the Past," Gershow Recycling purchases scrap metal that would have otherwise wound up in local landfills, and turns them into high-quality scrap products for recycling. The company produces both ferrous and non-ferrous products.