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TROPICAL STORM FAY TO BRING HEAVY RAINFALL, GUSTY WINDS, AND DANGEROUS SURF CONDITIONS This product covers Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut **TROPICAL STORM FAY TO BRING HEAVY RAINFALL, GUSTY WINDS, AND DANGEROUS SURF CONDITIONS** NEW INFORMATION --------------- * CHANGES TO WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - A Tropical Storm Warning has been issued for Bronx, Eastern Essex, Eastern Union, Hudson, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Northeastern Suffolk, Northern Nassau, Northern Queens, Northwestern Suffolk, Richmond (Staten Island), Southeastern Suffolk, Southern Fairfield, Southern Middlesex, Southern Nassau, Southern New Haven, Southern New London, Southern Queens, Southern Westchester, and Southwestern Suffolk * CURRENT WATCHES AND WARNINGS: - A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Bronx, Eastern Essex, Eastern Union, Hudson, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Northeastern Suffolk, Northern Nassau, Northern Queens, Northwestern Suffolk, Richmond (Staten Island), Southeastern Suffolk, Southern Fairfield, Southern Middlesex, Southern Nassau, Southern New Haven, Southern New London, Southern Queens, Southern Westchester, and Southwestern Suffolk * STORM INFORMATION: - About 370 miles south of New York City NY or about 420 miles south-southwest of Montauk Point NY - 35.5N 74.9W - Storm Intensity 45 mph - Movement North or 360 degrees at 7 mph SITUATION OVERVIEW ------------------ Tropical Storm Fay located along North Carolina Outer Banks will move northward along the coast towards the area Friday and will make landfall near the New York City area Friday night. The main threats with this system will be locally heavy rainfall, the potential for flash flooding, and dangerous surf conditions Friday into Friday night. POTENTIAL IMPACTS ----------------- * FLOODING RAIN: Protect against dangerous rainfall flooding having possible significant impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - Moderate rainfall flooding may prompt several evacuations and rescues. - Rivers and streams may quickly become swollen with swifter currents and may overspill their banks in a few places, especially in usually vulnerable spots. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches may overflow. - Flood waters can enter some structures or weaken foundations. Several places may experience expanded areas of rapid inundation at underpasses, low lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Some streets and parking lots take on moving water as storm drains and retention ponds overflow. Driving conditions become hazardous. Some road and bridge closures. * WIND: Protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - Damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored mobile homes. Unsecured lightweight objects blown about. - Many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over. - A few roads impassable from debris, particularly within urban or heavily wooded places. Hazardous driving conditions on bridges and other elevated roadways. - Scattered power and communications outages. * TORNADOES: Protect against a tornado event having possible limited impacts across Southeast New York, Northeast New Jersey, and Southern Connecticut. Potential impacts include: - The occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution of emergency plans during tropical events. - A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power and communications disruptions. - Locations could realize roofs peeled off buildings, chimneys toppled, mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned, large tree tops and branches snapped off, shallow rooted trees knocked over, moving vehicles blown off roads, and small boats pulled from moorings. * OTHER COASTAL HAZARDS: Beach flooding and localized dune erosion along the Atlantic Ocean beachfront are possible during the times of high tide Friday through Saturday. Low probability of minor coastal flooding in vulnerable coastal areas during the high tide on Friday night.

Homeowner How To: Lead Paint Safety

LongIsland.com

Lead paint? Yep. It can be dangerous. Here is what you need to know about it before you renovate or paint in a home built before 1978.

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Beginning in April of 2010, a new federal law went into effect with regard to renovating or painting in homes that may contain lead based paint. The law basically says if you plan to disturb any area greater than six square feet of lead based paint in homes, child care facilities and schools built before 1978, you must have it tested for the presence of lead paint prior to starting the work. (Or of more than 20 square feet of exterior surfaces.)

If lead is found, the work must be done in a specific manner, by certified contractors who follow certain work practices to prevent lead contamination and reduce your risk of exposure.

Lead paint can be especially dangerous to young children, infants and pregnant women. If you have an issue with paint chipping and children are living in the home, you will want to get your home tested. Lead paint is said to cause a wide variety of health issues, especially in children.

Here are some facts about lead poisoning:

  • Lead can affect children’s brains and developing nervous systems, which can result in behavioral problems, learning disabilities and cause a reduced IQ.
  • Lead is hazardous to adults and can cause high blood pressure and hypertension. Pregnant women who are exposed to lead can transfer lead to their fetus.
  • Dust contaminated with lead is the most common source of exposure. Lead dust is often invisible. People can get lead in their bodies from soil or paint chips as well.
  • Lead based paint was used in more than 38 million residential homes before it was banned back in 1978.


Common renovation activities like sanding, demolition and cutting can disturb the old paint and create hazardous dust and chips. So if you are planning to disturb the paint in, remove walls or renovate your home and it is older than 1978, be prepared to have it tested by a certified inspector before the job can properly begin. Make sure the testing firm is certified and get a printed copy of the findings. This will be required by a contractor to begin the work.

To help find a certified risk assessor or inspector call the National Lead Information Center at 1-800- 424-LEAD (5323) or for more information on dealing with lead, for do-it-yourself-ers and what to expect when lead is found and must be removed, visit  www.epa.gov/lead.

If you currently live in a home built before 1978 you can protect your family by regularly cleaning the floors, surfaces and window sills. Be sure to wash your childrens hands, bottles, pacifiers and toys often to remove any possible lead dust that may be there. Stay away from visibly cracked paint and clean up any paint chips that may be lying around
(inside your home, basement and outdoors). Renovate safely!

 

 

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