Weather Alert(2)!
"Wind Chill Advisory" ...Wind Chill Advisory remains in effect until noon EST today... * locations...New York City...Long Island and portions of northeastern New Jersey. * Hazard types...dangerous wind chills. * Timing...this morning. * Wind chill...15 to 24 degrees below zero. * Winds...northwest 15 to 25 mph with gusts up to 35 mph. * Impacts...the frigid conditions will be dangerous to those venturing outside. Prolonged exposure may cause frostbite. The combination of very low wind chills and frigid air temperatures have the potential to result in frozen pipes...frostbite and hypothermia. Precautionary/preparedness actions... A Wind Chill Advisory means that very cold air and strong winds will combine to generate low wind chills. This will result in frost bite and lead to hypothermia if precautions are not taken. Outdoor exposure should be limited. If you are heading outdoors... dress in layers and keep your hands and head covered to protect against frostbite , "Special Statement" ...Dangerously cold wind chills tonight into Sunday morning... * temperatures tonight into early Sunday morning will fall to zero to 3 degrees below zero in and around the New York City and New Jersey Metro...and Long Island...and coastal Connecticut. Temps will fall to 5 to 10 degrees below across interior portions of northeast New Jersey...the lower Hudson Valley...and southern Connecticut. Wind chill values during this time are expected to reach life threatening levels as cold as 20 to 30 degrees below zero. * High temperatures on Sunday will only be in the teens...with wind chills likely not rising above zero until mid to late afternoon. * Cold spells of this magnitude bring a risk of frostbite and hypothermia for anyone who does not take proper precautions. In addition...frozen pipes and overworked furnaces could leave your house without heat or running water...and car batteries run the risk of dying. * Never venture outdoors without wearing gloves...a hat and several layers of clothing. Wind chill values late Saturday night into Sunday morning could lead to frostbite in less than 30 minutes if proper precautions are not taken. * Run water at a trickle and keep Cabinet doors open to prevent pipes from freezing. * Never use a stove or oven to heat your home or use an open flame to melt frozen pipes. Many house fires result from these practices. * Check tire pressure and your car battery. Be sure your car has a winter safety kit that includes a blanket...warm clothes and gloves in case your car breaks down or becomes stranded. * Take extra steps to keep your pets warm and know their limits to cold. 435 am EST Sat Feb 13 2016 ...Dangerously cold wind chills tonight into Sunday morning... * temperatures tonight into early Sunday morning will fall to zero to 3 degrees below zero in and around the New York City and New Jersey Metro...and Long Island...and coastal Connecticut. Temps will fall to 5 to 10 degrees below across interior portions of northeast New Jersey...the lower Hudson Valley...and southern Connecticut. Wind chill values during this time are expected to reach life threatening levels as cold as 20 to 30 degrees below zero. * High temperatures on Sunday will only be in the teens...with wind chills likely not rising above zero until mid to late afternoon. * Cold spells of this magnitude bring a risk of frostbite and hypothermia for anyone who does not take proper precautions. In addition...frozen pipes and overworked furnaces could leave your house without heat or running water...and car batteries run the risk of dying. * Never venture outdoors without wearing gloves...a hat and several layers of clothing. Wind chill values late Saturday night into Sunday morning could lead to frostbite in less than 30 minutes if proper precautions are not taken. * Run water at a trickle and keep Cabinet doors open to prevent pipes from freezing. * Never use a stove or oven to heat your home or use an open flame to melt frozen pipes. Many house fires result from these practices. * Check tire pressure and your car battery. Be sure your car has a winter safety kit that includes a blanket...warm clothes and gloves in case your car breaks down or becomes stranded. * Take extra steps to keep your pets warm and know their limits to cold. -- Sunday Feb.14 16,05:00 AM Weather  |  LIRR  |  Traffic  |  Traffic Cams |  Weather News

 

Packing for College: Getting Ready to Move to Campus

School & Education, Top Ten on Long Island, Travel & Local Attractions

It is time for back to school for college students. With classes starting very soon at universities, first-timers and experienced college students will be heading ...

College is an exciting time for many young people, particularly those who will be living on campus. Transitioning from home life to campus life can be difficult, so being prepared before you go can help the transition.

There are many elements of the campus that students have to keep in mind when living on campus:

  • Meal Plan: Do you live in a cooking dorm or does your dorm require you have a meal plan? This is an expense that many students forget to think about.
  • Laundry: Does the campus offer coin operated machines or do you use a preloaded card? Some students may opt for their laundry to be cleaned through a service that can be provided by the campus or off campus at an extra cost.
  • Transportation: Don't assume that all resident students can have a car on campus. Some colleges only allow upperclassman to have cars or only commuters. Be sure to check with your college before packing up your car. Also, learn about public transportation in the area.

After keeping the above in mind, check out these great tips for packing an preparing to move back to campus this fall!

  • Don't Bring Everything: Living on campus is only temporary, so you do not need to bring everything with you. Expensive jewelry and electronic items should stay at home as well as to avoid being stolen.
  • Avoid Spending a lot on Bedding: Generally, you will need to purchase twin extra long bed sheets. Your sheets are important, but spending a couple of hundred dollars on bed sheets can turn into a waste. Mattresses may not be in the best conditions, so invest in a mattress cover, foam mattress cover and a couple of cheap pillows. Because they are hard to clean, the cover, foam, and pillows can be thrown out at the end of each year.
  • Desk and Other Furniture: Double check with your school to see if they will have a desk and other furniture in your room. Do not buy furniture without finding out what you need. Also, when you are unpacking in your dorm, do not remove school property from the room because you may feel you do not need it. For example, if you bring your own desk chair and remove it from your room, you may get charges at the end of the year.
  • Forget Luggage, Use Garbage Bags (If traveling by car): Dorms are small, imagine having the store luggage all year and taking up space in your already cramped dorm room. Pro-tip: if you want to travel with luggage, consider unpacking your luggage and then having your parents take it home to bring back at the end of the year.
  • Tumble Dry Low/High Is Your Friend: If you have a lot of clothes that require to hang dry, you might have a difficult time properly doing your laundry. Be sure to pack clothes that not only look great, but are easy to clean.
  • Have a Hamper for Laundry: Clothes get dirty, have a place for them. When that hamper fills, it is time to clean the clothes. You don't want to, but you have to. Be sure to get two foldable ones in two different colors: one for dirty and one for clean.
  • Pack an Umbrella and Rain Boots: Something that is often forgotten is that bad weather happens on campus, so be prepared with the proper attire.
  • Pack Everything in Milk Carts: Not only do they stack well, they can be made into makeshift bookcases and storage.

Experienced college travelers, what packing tips do you have? Tell us in the comments below!

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