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Acclaimed theatrical production "Running Scared, Running Free" returns by popular demand

The Role Native Americans played in support of Underground Railroad

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: Marie Gilberti, WMHO
(631) 751-2244

ACCLAIMED DRAMA BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND -WMHO PRESENTS...Running Scared, Running Free

The Role Native Americans played in support of Underground Railroad

Stony Brook, NY - January 9, 2012, Long Island will have an amazing opportunity to see a riveting, live theatrical performance about the role Native Americans played in the Underground Railroad as they assisted escaping slaves from south through Long Island and on to Canada.

Running Scared, Running Free, based on investigative research compiled by The Ward Melville Heritage Organization (WMHO), opens March 14 at their Educational and Cultural Center in Stony Brook Village. The program is partially sponsored by Empire National Bank and Macys. Over 7,000 people attended original performances when the drama was first presented by WMHO in 2005.

Written and produced by St. George Productions, Running Scared, Running Free is set in the mid-1850s and highlights the connection between fleeing slaves and Native Americans of Long Island, specifically those in the Setauket area. Told through the eyes of a female slave who flees South Carolina and heads north in her search of freedom, this interactive production shows how Native American Indians in Setauket, as well as the Shinnecocks, Quakers and abolitionists, were instrumental in helping slaves escape through the intriguing use of codes in quilt patterns as a means of communication. This remarkable story brings to life a fascinating piece of American history.

Matinee performances will include tea and desserts from both the North (Northern Apple Pie) and South (Robert E. Lee's Orange Pie). Performance dates are March 14, 15, 21, 22, 28, 29 (10 am & 2 pm matinee) and March 24 & 31 (2 pm matinee only). Program categories and costs are as follows:

MATINEE ADMISSION: $20 pp (min. 35)
GENERAL ADMISSION: $12 per adult; $12 per student (up to 35) / $8 per student (over 35)
IN-SCHOOL PERFORMANCES: $1,500
DISTANCE LEARNING: $250 per class connection (IP and ISPN connectivity)
(Aligned to meet National and New York State Common Core Standards and BOCES Arts-in-Education reimbursable)

For further information call 631-751-2244 or visit www.stonybrookvillage.com